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Supposing I have the following:

module A
  class B
    # ...
  end

  # ...
end

And suppose I have several different files like this, with different values of B, but all in the same module (A). From a program that require's a file that then require's each of these files, is there a way with introspection/reflection (are these different things? I'm hazy on the distinction, if so) to determine (and get objects for) each class within the module?

I've tried this, which gets me sort of close:

A.constants # => ["B"]

But I'd prefer to get back [A::B], rather than a string, so that I can then call something like singleton_methods on it, which would be useful to my program, which is attempting to map data into calls into the various subclasses' methods.

Is there some way to do this? I've been digging for answers, and found a few related things, like this or this, but nothing that's quite spot on.

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2 Answers 2

thats my final solution based on lindes answer:

    def all_classes_in_module_except_base(module_class)
      Dir["#{Rails.root}/app/domains/#{module_class.to_s.underscore}s/*.rb"].each { |file| load file }
      module_class.constants.collect { |k| module_class.const_get(k) }.select { |k|
        k.is_a?(Class) && k.name.demodulize != "Base"
      }
    end
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Isn't this then Rails-specific, though? And going unnecessarily to the file system for part of the answer? Not sure what exactly you were trying to solve; was it not solved by my original answer? What was missing? –  lindes Aug 17 at 19:33
    
you are right, we ended up using: extend ActiveSupport::DescendantsTracker in out Base class. –  nils petersohn Aug 18 at 14:05
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Hah! Wouldn't you know it? Just after writing this, I discovered an answer that seems to work for me:

A.constants.collect{|k| A.const_get(k)}.select {|k| k.is_a?(Class)} # => [A::B]

Sweet, that was easy, once I put the right pieces together. :)

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1  
yeah, its most often like that if you try to express your problem with words. This action is giving a unique viewpoint to your brain :) –  nils petersohn Aug 15 at 10:05

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