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I have a struct :

typedef struct 
{      
    int nNum;     
    string str;    
}KeyPair;

Then I initialize my struct into something like this:

KeyPair keys[] =  
{    
    {0, "tester"},        
    {2, "yadah"},        
    {0, "tester"}  
};   

And yet, let's say a number of other initializations:

KeyPair keysA[] =  
{    
    {0, "tester"},        
    {2, "yadah"},        
    {0, "tester"}  
};   



KeyPair keysB[] =  
{    
    {0, "testeras"},        
    {2, "yadahsdf"},        
    {3, "testerasss"}  
};   



KeyPair OtherkeysA[] =  
{    
    {1, "tester"},        
    {2, "yadah"},        
    {3, "tester"}  
};

and like 20 more of 'em.

Now, how do I create another struct and initialize it such that it contains these initiazed KeyPairs?

The reason for this is because I will repetitively call a function whose parameters would come for these structs. And I DO NOT want to do it this way:

pressKeyPairs( keys, sizeof( keys) / sizeof( keys[0] ) );
pressKeyPairs( keysA, sizeof( keysA) / sizeof( keysA[0] ) );
pressKeyPairs( keysB, sizeof( keysB) / sizeof( keysB[0] ) );
pressKeyPairs( OtherkeysA, sizeof( OtherkeysA) / sizeof( OtherkeysA[0] ) );
and so on...

So I would like to just loop through a struct containing these inilialized instantiations of KeyPairs...

OR I would like to put these initialized instances of KeyPairs into a vector and just loop through the vector... How do I do that?

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1  
What do you want to do? You are creating a bunch of arrays of KeyPairs; do you want to concatenate them? –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 7 '11 at 6:06
    
Are you trying to store them all in an array? –  Marlon Feb 7 '11 at 6:16
3  
If the other struct contains pointers to KeyPair arrays, just use the names of the above arrays you declared as the initializers for the pointers. If the other struct actually contains KeyPair arrays, then you just use another level of nested braces in the initializer. –  R.. Feb 7 '11 at 6:18
    
Can you consider a vector of map or multi-map? –  Quizzical Feb 7 '11 at 7:18
2  
Why not #define PRESS_KEY_PAIRS(keys) pressKeyPairs(keys, sizeof(keys) / sizeof(keys[0]))? Makes your job a lot less error prone, if nothing else. If you're really allergic to macros you could make pressKeyPairs a template function that takes a reference to an array and not need to pass the size: template <size_t N> void pressKeyPairs(KeyPair (&keys)[N]) If you can't change the function, you can write a wrapper to the same effect: template <size_t N> void myPressKeyPairs(KeyPair (&keys)[N]) { pressKeyPairs(keys, N); } Short story: You can make your job easier in other ways. –  Chris Lutz Feb 7 '11 at 8:22
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3 Answers 3

Assuming that you have a fixed number key pairs, you could use a structure member function:

typedef struct KeyPairs {
    KeyPair keysA[3];
    KeyPair keysB[3];
    KeyPair otherKeysA[3];

    void init() {
       keysA[0].nNum = 0;
       keysA[0].str = "tester";
       keysA[1].nNum = 2;
       keysA[1].str = "yadah";
       keysA[2].nNum = 0;
       keysA[2].str = "tester";

       // and so on for other keys
    }
} KeyPairs;

Then use it like so:

KeyPairs pairs;
pairs.init();
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1  
Your other option (which is probably better) is to have a separate init() function outside of the struct (e.g. in the same class as where you use the structs) that manually iterates through and initializes the structs. –  TREVOR Feb 7 '11 at 6:12
4  
This is not initialization. –  R.. Feb 7 '11 at 6:16
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How about doing real C++ and using constructors ?

(note that typedefs are implicits for structs in C++)

struct KeyPair
{
    int nNum;     
    string str;

    public:
    KeyPair() {}
    KeyPair(int n, string s) : nNum(n), str(s) {}

};

And then use another struct :

struct TripleKeyPair
{
    KeyPair keys[3];

    TripleKeyPair() 
    {
        // Your initialisation code goes here
    }
};

And finally, I wouldn't advice using names such as :

KeysA, KeysB, KeysC ...

Arrays are exactly for this. Why note use std::vector ?

share|improve this answer
    
How do I put these initialized instances of KeyPairs in a vector? –  Owen Feb 8 '11 at 3:29
    
Google is your friend ;) –  otibom Feb 8 '11 at 16:33
    
If Google always worked for specific questions like these, StackOverflow wouldn't have had existed... :) –  Owen Feb 9 '11 at 2:54
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How about using "null" objects as delimiters in the array? You would have to use constructors though:

struct KeyPair
{
    KeyPair() : fIsEmpty(true) {}
    KeyPair(int nNum_, const char *szStr) : nNum(nNum_), str(szStr), fIsEmpty(false) {}

    int nNum;
    string str;
    bool fIsEmpty;
};

Then you can initialize it like this:

KeyPair allKeys[] = 
{
    KeyPair(0, "testeras"),      
    KeyPair(2, "yadahsdf"),
    KeyPair(3, "testerasss"),
    KeyPair(),
    KeyPair(0, "tester"),
    KeyPair(2, "yadah"),
    KeyPair(3, "tester"),
    KeyPair(1, "moreyadah"),
    KeyPair()
};

And the iteration is trivial if you implement a kind of strlen() analog for KeyPair object array.

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1  
This is a good alternative to using std::vector since it avoids dynamic memory allocation and provides better initialization semantics without any significant impact on usage semantics. –  dnlgl Feb 8 '11 at 10:33
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