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I need design a simple LINQ to Entity query using EF. I am pretty new at it and I am stuck for more of 1 day.

From my DataBase table are:

CmsJobs
CmsJobsContents (Pure Junctional Table)
CmsContents  

I need list a series of CmsContents with a specific CmsJobs.JobId

Any idea how to do it? Thanks for your help

My Model EF:

enter image description here

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Singulariz your entity names would be a good thing to do imho. –  YoupTube Feb 7 '11 at 12:39
    
And obviously when you are this (see question) new to EF :P reading a good book won't harm you. –  YoupTube Feb 7 '11 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
CmsJob job = (from j in dataContext.CmsJobs where j.JobId == jobIdIAmLookingFor select j).FirstOrDefault();   
IEnumerable<CmsContent> theContentItems = job.CmsContents;
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HI, i receive an error Error 1 Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Linq.IQueryable<WebProject.DataAccess.DatabaseModels.CmsJob>' to 'WebProject.DataAccess.DatabaseModels.CmsJob'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?) –  GibboK Feb 7 '11 at 9:53
    
any idea how to solve it??? –  GibboK Feb 7 '11 at 9:54
    
Ah, sorry about that. Updated the answer. It was complaining that the first query could potentially return multiple jobs (the compiler doesn't know that there will (hopefully) only be one job with a given identifier). Adding the .FirstOrDefault() makes the query return the first matching job or null if no such job exists. –  Rune Feb 7 '11 at 9:56
    
Thanks Rune, now it is works! :-) Just a question is your code LINQ to Entity or are you also using Query builder methods? thanks once again –  GibboK Feb 7 '11 at 9:59
    
hi, what about this int findJobId = 58; CmsJob findJob = context.CmsJobs.FirstOrDefault(x => x.JobId == findJobId); IEnumerable<CmsContent> resultContents = findJob.CmsContents; –  GibboK Feb 7 '11 at 15:27

Or more readible and faster (I recently did a lot of tests to query the model from one way or the other (fromout a CmsJobs perspective or fromout the CmsContents perspective):

    using(EntityModel context = new EntityModel())
    {
      List<CmsContents> list = context.CmsContents
                               .Include("CmsJobs")
                               .Where<CmsContents>(cc => cc.CmsJobs.Where<CmsJobs>(cj => cj.JobId == requiredId))
                               .ToList<CmsContents>()
    }

Did not test this, but should work I believe. Try it out yourself. It's the less logical way of querying perspective but gives you exactly what you need (a list of CmsContents entities) without the containing CmsJobs entity (as supposed by Rune).

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Just a note: you don't need the <CmsContents> in the Where() and ToList() methods, but it does make it more clear what they are returning. –  Hans Kesting Feb 7 '11 at 12:56
    
hi, thanks joep i will test it, did you use linq or Query builder methods? thanks –  GibboK Feb 7 '11 at 14:10
    
@Hans Kesting: I know but as you already mentioned it makes it more readable. @GIbbok: hmmm...Linq To Entities isn't it? –  YoupTube Feb 7 '11 at 14:37
    
hi, what about this int findJobId = 58; CmsJob findJob = context.CmsJobs.FirstOrDefault(x => x.JobId == findJobId); IEnumerable<CmsContent> resultContents = findJob.CmsContents; –  GibboK Feb 7 '11 at 15:25
    
@GIbbok: looks good. Do you see the different query approach? You query from the Job perspective as I queried from the Content perspective. This might have effects on performance as I mentioned earlier (based on table size of both tables, etc.). Also, you now have a Job entity in memory, do you really need that? When you really only need the Content entities consider using my approach. –  YoupTube Feb 7 '11 at 15:59

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