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I have a need to get the signal strength as part of an inline piece of work. My app has no activities, no services and a broadcast receiver. So in lifetime terms my code only runs when the broadcast intent (for phone call state) runs.

My question is what can I hang a PhoneStateListener off that will allow me to receive an event about signal strength when (or shortly after) I ask for it.

Is the GSM signal strength not delivered as a broadcastable event?

(I am trying to avoid having to put this listener in a service)

Thanks.

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I would like to know the answer to this too, How to access the SignalStrength class by polling, not by listener when something changes. –  JPM Jan 9 '13 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

My question is what can I hang a PhoneStateListener off that will allow me to receive an event about signal strength when (or shortly after) I ask for it.

You cannot set up a listener of any sort from a manifest-registered BroadcastReceiver.

Is the GSM signal strength not delivered as a broadcastable event?

Not so far as I can tell.

(I am trying to avoid having to put this listener in a service)

That is an admirable goal. Are you sure that you need the signal strength?

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That is debatable :-) I have an "app" that will intercept an outgoing call intent, "abort" the call, send a web service or SMS request to a host which will effectively call back the cell phone, call forward the destination and connect the two ends. I don't want to even attempt this whole process if the cell signal strength of the mobile on which the app is is low (or none). Would anything else be able to tell me something that approximates the signal strength / worthyness of the cell phone to take calls? Thanks. –  SCG Feb 7 '11 at 13:01
    
@SCG: "I don't want to even attempt this whole process if the cell signal strength of the mobile on which the app is is low (or none)." -- if it were "none", you wouldn't have the incoming call in the first place. I don't have any suggestions about "low", though. My assumption is that the current API was designed for stuff like home screens, not your situation. –  CommonsWare Feb 7 '11 at 13:10
    
While you are right, the experience a user gets is: a) make the call which is converted to a W/S call over wifi etc. which "works", b) never get called back due to no GSM signal strength, c) the called party having been called hears the answer phone of the caller!!!! (because the incoming call to the original phone was intercepted by the carrier who shunted it off to the mobile voicemail). Hope that makes sense. –  SCG Feb 7 '11 at 15:06

Since you are intercepting the outgoing call, you could use android.telephony.SignalStrength as needed to decide whether to proceed or not, instead of looking for a signal strength broadcast.

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Hi. Sounds good but how do I access that direct from the Telephony Manager? The only think I can find that would give me signal strength requires me to set up a listener which I don't think I can use as I have no actvity or service to hang it off. –  SCG Feb 7 '11 at 14:21
    
@SCG Apparently, there's an onSignalStrengthsChanged callback as part of PhoneStateListener that will provide a SignalStrength object for you to interrogate. –  RivieraKid Feb 7 '11 at 14:28
    
But that's the problem - in order to set up a listener and keep it active it would have to hang off something that has a "lifetime" like and Activity or Service. I am trying to avoid having to create either. –  SCG Feb 7 '11 at 15:04

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