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I would like to store the content of /etc/passwd in a structure, so I can update each value later on, but I can't figure out which structure to use.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

open PASSWD, "/etc/passwd";
while(<PASSWD>) {

    chomp;
    my @f = split /:/;

    print "username $f[0]\n";
    print "password $f[1]\n";
    print "uid      $f[2]\n";
    print "gid      $f[3]\n";
    print "gecos    $f[4]\n";
    print "home     $f[5]\n";
    print "shell    $f[6]\n";
    print "--------------------------\n";

}

I assume it should be an array of hashes, where the username is the key, but I can't figure out how to do this.

Is "Array of Hashes of Array" the way to go?

share|improve this question
1  
Less love for getpw* and friends each year. –  daxim Feb 7 '11 at 15:56
    
and i do not see any obvious reason for that. i use one of them at least once a week. –  matthias krull Feb 7 '11 at 16:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Store it in a hash with usernames as keys, and the split array as value:

my %passwd = ();

open PASSWD, "/etc/passwd";
while(<PASSWD>) {

    chomp;
    my @f = split /:/;
    @{$passwd{$f[0]}} = @f;
}
print $passwd{'Sjoerder'}[3];
share|improve this answer

See Passwd::Unix:

ABSTRACT

Passwd::Unix provides an abstract object-oriented and function interface to standard Unix files, such as /etc/passwd, /etc/shadow, /etc/group. Additionaly this module provides environment to testing new software, without using system critical files in /etc

share|improve this answer

The data structure you choose really depends on what you want to do with the data. If you're most interested in pulling in the data for a given user then you could just use a straight hash where keys are usernames and the value for a given key is a reference to an array of the values from /etc/passwd:

open PASSWD, '/etc/passwd';
my %users;
while (<PASSWD>) {
    chomp;
    next if /^\s*#/; # ignore comments
    my ($username, @details) = split /:/;
    $users{$username} = \@details;
}

# get values for user 'root'
my $values = $users{'root'};

# print root's home
print $values->[4];

If you want to be able to iterate over all users and pull details in a readable fashion you might choose an array of hashes, where each has represents a user and has keys for username, password, uid etc:

open PASSWD, '/etc/passwd';
my @users;
while (<PASSWD>) {
    chomp;
    next if /^\s*#/; # ignore comments
    my @f = split /:/;
    my %hash;
    @hash{'username','password','uid','gid','gecos','home','shell'} = @f;
    push @users, \%hash;
}
for my $user (@users) {
    print "User $user->{username} has home $user->{home}\n";
}

Hope this gives you some ideas!

share|improve this answer
    
I'd think an array-of-arrays would be a better option to iterate over the data for performance. And then for readability and maintainability, define some "constants", rather than remembering array index numbers. But your point is still important, we can't suggest a structure without understanding how it will be accessed. –  BMitch Feb 7 '11 at 12:29
3  
@B Mitch: Given the size of the typical /etc/passwd (usually a couple dozen users (including system accounts) and only very rarely more than a couple hundred), optimizing for performance in iterating over its contents seems pointless. Optimize for readability or functionality instead. –  Dave Sherohman Feb 7 '11 at 12:41

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