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class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<A> myList = new List<A> {new A(), new B(), new C()};

            foreach (var a in myList)
            {
                Render(a);
            }

            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static void Render(A o)
        {
            Console.Write("A");
        }

        private static void Render(B b)
        {
            Console.Write("B");
        }

        private static void Render(C c)
        {
            Console.Write("C");
        }
    }

    class A
    {

    }

    class B : A
    {

    }

    class C : A
    {

    }

The output is: AAA

Is it possible to somehow use method overloading, so that the output would be: ABC?

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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can use dynamic typing if you're using C# 4:

foreach (dynamic a in myList)
{
    Render(a);
}

Within static typing, overload resolution is performed at compile-time, not at execution time.

For the implementation to be chosen at decision time, you either have to use overriding instead of overloading, or use dynamic typing as above.

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1  
Even though overload resolution is done at compile time why is it "A a" is chosen over "B b" and "C c". –  Sandeep Feb 8 '11 at 3:33
1  
@Sandeep: Because the compile-time type of the a variable in Main is only A, because the list is a List<A>. So Render(a) can only pick Render(A a). –  Jon Skeet Feb 8 '11 at 6:23
1  
That makes sense. Thanks for your reply. –  Sandeep Feb 9 '11 at 3:59
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The following ought to do the trick, where we control the behaviour when working with a type within that type:

class A
{
    public virtual void Render()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A");
    }
}

class B : A
{
    public override void Render()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B");
    }
}

class C : A
{
    public override void Render()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("C");
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var myList = new List<A> { new A(), new B(), new C() };
    foreach (var a in myList)
    {
        a.Render();
    }
    Console.ReadKey();
}

And if you want the defined behaviour of a type to be additive to that of its parent, then call the method implemented in the base after executing your own logic, for example:

class B : A
{
    public override void Render()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B");
        base.Render();
    }
}
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Another way to accomplish this is with the visitor pattern: it allows you to achieve something like polymorphism using a two-way method calling system:

interface IRenderable
{
    AcceptForRender(Program renderer);
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var p = new Program();
        var myList = new List<IRenderable> {new A(), new B(), new C()};

        foreach (var a in myList)
        {
            a.AcceptForRender(p);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public void Render(A o)
    {
        Console.Write("A");
    }

    public void Render(B b)
    {
        Console.Write("B");
    }

    public void Render(C c)
    {
        Console.Write("C");
    }
}

class A : IRenderable
{
    public void AcceptForRender(Program renderer)
    {
        renderer.Render(this);
    }
}

class B : IRenderable
{
    public void AcceptForRender(Program renderer)
    {
        renderer.Render(this);
    }
}

class C : IRenderable
{
    public void AcceptForRender(Program renderer)
    {
        renderer.Render(this);
    }
}

The advantage to this approach is that it allows you to effectively achieve polymorphism (each type ensures the correct overload is called by passing the strongly-typed this to Render internally) while keeping logic that does not belong in your types themselves (e.g., visual rendering logic) out.

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Make A B C deriving from a base ( abstract ) class, define in that class a method Render and override properly in each A B C . Instead of calling Render(a) then call a.Render() this is the way polymorfism is supposed to work.

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