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I have a template class ,MyClass<class E,class T>,and i want to use :

std::unary_function<T,bool> _predicate; std::binary_function<T,E,void> _swaper;

as template template parameters in my class , notice the bool and the void which is partial template specialization ....

can someone tell how MyClass decleration and ctor that should take predicate and swaper as arguments should look like ?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

depends if you need to use the parameters only in the constructor or not. Could be:

class MyClass
{
    template <class T, class E>
    MyClass(std::unary_function<T,bool> p, std::binary_function<T,E,void> s)
    {
    ...
    }
...
}

or

template <class T, class E>
class MyClass
{
    MyClass(std::unary_function<T,bool> p, std::binary_function<T,E,void> s)
    {
    ...
    }
...
}
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this is exactly as i've tried but it seems not to work and again you miss the issue of template template arguments... you need to declare it in other way : template <class T,class E> is not enough if you have template template arguments like unary_function and binary_function.... –  Robocide Feb 7 '11 at 14:04
    
can you please add a full sample of what you have done and what is not working? –  Loghorn Feb 7 '11 at 14:15
    
its all a mess now with all the modifications...ffff.... –  Robocide Feb 7 '11 at 14:17
    
one important thing: the code I posted is perfectly valid but assumes that the type of the first argument (the only one for unary_function) is the same. If not, you need a third template parameter. Also note that if you use the second version of the code (template class) you will need to provide the template arguments on instantiation. –  Loghorn Feb 7 '11 at 14:23
    
figured it out see below, thanks for your help. –  Robocide Feb 7 '11 at 15:40

i've just figured it out ... there is no use of ctor like:

MyClass(std::unary_function<T,bool> p, std::binary_function<T,E,void> s)

the std::unary_function is just a struct decleration it does not contain operator() and ofcourse not a virtual operator() , thus it has no use as an argument in a function...

this is how it supposed to look like :

template <class T, class E,class PredicateFunctionUnaryOperator,class SwapFunctionBinaryOperator> 
class MyClass
{
private:
    PredicateFunctionUnaryOperator _p;
    SwapFunctionBinaryOperator _s;
    T _arg1;
    E _arg2;
public:
    MyClass(PredicateFunctionUnaryOperator p, SwapFunctionBinaryOperator s,T arg1,E arg2): _p(p),_s(s)
    {
        _arg1 = arg1;
        _arg2 = arg2;
    }
    void f()
    {
        std::cout<<"Unary Function output is :"<<_p(_arg1)<<endl;;
        std::cout<<"Binary Function Output is:"<<_s(_arg1,_arg2);


        std::cout<<"Chauoo!!"<<endl;
    }
};

but as i can see its working i cant understand when is the special syntax template decleration that is related with "template template parameters" is used...

Thanks.

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