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let's take this code to implement the operator<< for two classes:

#include <iostream>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;

class A
{
    int a1_;
public:
    A(int a1) : a1_(a1){}
    std::ostream& print(std::ostream& os) const
    {
        return os << "a1_ : " << a1_ << endl;
    }
};

class B
{
    int b1_;
    double b2_;
public:
    B(int b1,double b2) : b1_(b1),b2_(b2){}
    std::ostream& print(std::ostream& os) const
    {
        os << "b1_ : " << b1_ << endl;
        os << "b2_ : " << b2_ << endl;
        return os;
    }
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A& in)
{
    return in.print(os);
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const B& in)
{
    return in.print(os);
}

int main(int argc,char* argv[])
{
    A myA(10);
    B myB(20,30.14);

    cout << myA << myB << endl;
    return 0;
}

Because I am lazy I'd like to provide a template version of operator<< instead of the two versions as above. I can do it easily replacing with:

template< class T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const T& in)
{
    return in.print(os);
}

So far so good. If I have several classes I can implement the operator<< in one go. The trouble start when one of my classes is a class template. Let's take the previous example but with B class template:

#include <iostream>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;

class A
{
    int a1_;
public:
    A(int a1) : a1_(a1){}
    std::ostream& print(std::ostream& os) const
    {
        return os << "a1_ : " << a1_ << endl;
    }
};

template <class T>
class B
{
    int b1_;
    T b2_;
public:
    B(int b1,T b2) : b1_(b1),b2_(b2){}
    std::ostream& print(std::ostream& os) const
    {
        os << "b1_ : " << b1_ << endl;
        os << "b2_ : " << b2_ << endl;
        return os;
    }
};


std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A& in)
{
    return in.print(os);
}

template <class T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const B<T>& in)
{
    return in.print(os);
}

int main(int argc,char* argv[])
{
    A myA(10);
    B<A> myB(20,myA);

    cout << myA << myB << endl;
    return 0;
}

This version works and I have the expected result, however I have provided two operator<< functions (one for each class), let's imagine that I have 200 classes that already implement a public ostream& print(ostream& os) const. Some of them are template class (with also multiple parameters).

How can I write a template version of the operator<< in this scenario?

Thanks for you help.

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3  
Your first code also works for class templates. However, beware that it will work for all classes that don’t define an own operator << and this is probably not desirable. In particular, such a function is already defined somewhere in the standard library and you are bound to violate the one definition rule with your definition. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 7 '11 at 16:22
    
@Konrad: What do you mean? That one should never get the "no operator<< for XXX" error? –  UncleBens Feb 7 '11 at 16:31
    
@Konrad: won't it be a better match if it's defined for a particular class ? –  Matthieu M. Feb 7 '11 at 16:37
1  
@Matthieu M. This is prone to error. The problem would be if the operator<< for a type is also templated (ambiguous call) or if it is not recognized at the place of call (i.e. have not included the header). Because of this templated version, the compiler will gladly take the code and use the template instead of the proper version. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 7 '11 at 16:43
    
@David: yes, it's definitely a bad idea to have a catch'em all template, it's just I am still hazy on the overload resolution (was already in C++03 and C++0x makes it even worse) so I use every opportunity to learn :) –  Matthieu M. Feb 7 '11 at 16:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Same as above:

template< class T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const T& in)
{
    return in.print(os);
}

However, a "catch all" overload like that is a bit like dynamite fishing. You can constrain the range of the operator to all T's which define a suitable "print" member using SFINAE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Substitution_failure_is_not_an_error):

template<int X, typename T>
struct enabler
{
    typedef T type;
};
template<class T>
typename enabler< sizeof(&T::print), std::ostream&>::type
operator << (std::ostream &o, const T &t)
{
    t.print(o);
    return o;
}

This effectively disables the operator<< when searching for a suitable overload, if T has no member print(std::ostream&)

share|improve this answer
    
I have tried that, I am using visual studio 2010 and the compiler gives me one error (error C2593: 'operator <<' is ambiguous) inside the A::print function. –  Alessandro Teruzzi Feb 7 '11 at 16:39
1  
This is why I called this dynamite fishing. You will catch more than you ever wanted..The enabler thingie should fix this. –  Nordic Mainframe Feb 7 '11 at 16:46
    
It would not work with ADL though, unless every object lives in the global namespace of course. Nice enabler by the way, hadn't thought of using size_of. –  Matthieu M. Feb 7 '11 at 16:50
    
This is just using a smaller stick of dynamite. :-) We don't know if every class with a print function does what we want. –  Bo Persson Feb 7 '11 at 22:21

This is, actually, what the Concepts were intended for. You can emulate them with Boost.Concepts at the moment.

However, there is one issue with your solution: Argument Dependent Lookup.

When you use an operator, it need be:

  • either in the current scope (the search will radiate outward to consider more and more global scope)
  • or in the namespace of one of the argument.

However if you define your template overload, it cannot be present in the namespace of all those other classes.

I suggest cheating.

If you wrap std::ostream& in a class of your own, you can then, in its namespace, provide all the operator overloads that you wish for:

namespace X {

struct MyStream
{
  MyStream(std::ostream& o): _o(o) {}
  std::ostream& _o;
};

template <typename T>
MyStream& operator<<(MyStream& s, T const& t)
{
  t.print(s._o);
  return s;
}

} // namespace X

You can then add opportunistic overloads for common types:

inline MyStream& operator<<(MyStream& s, bool b)
{
  s._o << (b ? 'Y' : 'N');
  return s;
}

Without risking a clash with functions defined in std.

Note that it trades reworking the class hierarchy (having a common PrintableInterface would be great too) vs reworking the calls. The latter can be done with a search and replace though.

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