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When I compile the Python code below, I get

IndentationError: unindent does not match any outer indentation level


import sys

def Factorial(n): # Return factorial
    result = 0
    for i in range (1,n):
        result = result * i
    print "factorial is ",result
    return result

Why?

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I fixed some indentation in SO, not sure why it isn't looking properly in edit mode(?) –  cbrulak Jan 29 '09 at 16:37
7  
If you won't change the 'result = 0' to 'result = 1', your factorial won't be... well... accurate :-) –  Abgan Jan 29 '09 at 16:45
3  
and probably range(1, n+1) will be better, if you want to include 'n' in your computation :-) –  Abgan Jan 29 '09 at 16:46
    
My $0.02 , try out sourceforge.net/projects/spe. Its a very nice free, python centric dev environment. It helped me forget this error. –  Perpetualcoder Jan 29 '09 at 17:39
1  
I had the same error, but I happened to indent a method way up in the code slightly to the left, which gave this error at the bottom of the next method after it. So this error can occur not only from mixing tabs and spaces. –  Prof. Falken Nov 2 '12 at 12:41
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12 Answers

up vote 108 down vote accepted

EDIT: Other posters are probably correct...there might be spaces mixed in with your tabs. Try doing a search&replace to replace all tabs with a few spaces.

Try this:

import sys

def Factorial(n): # return factorial
    result = 1
    for i in range (1,n):
        result = result * i
    print "factorial is ",result
    return result

print Factorial(10)
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1  
yeah, I had to really space over the inner loop part at the last two lines (in SO only). Not sure why... –  cbrulak Jan 29 '09 at 16:40
    
my first line, "result = 0" (which should ahve been 1, thanks for correcting) was spaced while the rest was tabbed, darn, didn't know python was like that –  cbrulak Jan 29 '09 at 16:44
    
Yeah, that can be tricky. I use emacs to edit python, and I have it setup to always replace tabs with spaces in py files so I don't have this problem. Notepad++ might have an option like this as well. –  Kevin Tighe Jan 29 '09 at 16:49
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To easily check for problems with tabs/spaces you can actually do this:

python -m tabnanny yourfile.py

or you can just set up your editor correctly of course :-)

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I tried this in a file with some tab/space indentation error, but no output at all with an incorrect tab file. any idea? –  Luchux Mar 16 '12 at 3:32
    
Thank you for the great answer! –  neurix Oct 9 '13 at 22:40
    
You saved my day @Andre, thanks again –  Ishan Liyanage Nov 19 '13 at 7:07
    
very helpful hint –  mybecks Nov 21 '13 at 14:21
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Are you sure you are not mixing tabs and spaces in your indentation white space? (That will cause that error.)

Note, it is recommended that you don't use tabs in Python code. See the style guide. You should configure Notepad++ to insert spaces for tabs.

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Whenever I've encountered this error, it's because I've somehow mixed up tabs and spaces in my editor.

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The line: result = result * i should be indented (it is the body of the for-loop).

Or - you have mixed space and tab characters

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I had to change the editing in SO, strange. See my updated "Edit" note in the question –  cbrulak Jan 29 '09 at 16:41
    
Ok, so I believe that second line of my answer is correct - you have mixed space and tab characters (32 and 8 in ASCII, respectively) –  Abgan Jan 29 '09 at 16:44
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Looks to be an indentation problem. You don't have to match curly brackets in Python but you do have to match indentation levels.

The best way to prevent space/tab problems is to display invisible characters within your text editor. This will give you a quick way to prevent and/or resolve indentation-related errors.

Also, injecting copy-pasted code is a common source for this type of problem.

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If you use Python's IDLE editor you can do as it suggests in one of similar error messages:

1) select all, e.g. Ctrl + A

2) Go to Format -> Untabify Region

3) Double check your indenting is still correct, save and rerun your program.

I'm using Python 2.5.4

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Wonderful solution. Most editors use 4 spaces for tabs. –  Julian Mar 16 at 19:44
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It could be because the function above it is not indented the same way. i.e.

class a:
    def blah:
      print("Hello world")
    def blah1:
      print("Hello world")
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The syntax of the example code is invalid. –  falsetru Feb 14 at 3:14
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This is because there is a mix-up of both tabs and spaces. You can either remove all the spaces and replace them with tabs.

Or, Try writing this:

#!/usr/bin/python -tt

at the beginning of the code. This line resolves any differences between tabs and spaces.

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in my case, the problem was the configuration of pydev on Eclipse

pydev @ Eclipse

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If you use notepad++, do a "replace" with extended search mode to find \t and replace with four spaces.

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After setting up your editor following pep8, you still have problems. A good trick to solve this is replacing your four spaces by one tab. Actually python does not support 4 spaces in place of 1 tab.

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3  
The standard method is to use spaces and not tabs. Python does support using 4 spaces, it just doesn't support mixing spaces and tabs. –  interjay Jun 12 '13 at 16:31
1  
And what did I say? Python does not support four spaces to replace one tab (if you are mixing tabs and spaces). No reason to have -3 to my answer, you just did not read the answer and went straight to flag as negative. Is there any person in the world who types space by space instead of using an editor with a 4-space-tab setup? –  Mauricio Abreu Jul 5 '13 at 14:38
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