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This is one of those things where i just know im doing it wrong. My assignment is simple.

Create 3 classes in c++,

product ,software ,book. product is super, book and software are product. then make an array of pointers and fill the array with software and books.

so i've done the following

int main()
{
 Product *productList[10];          


 Book *pBook;                       
 Book q(5);
 pBook = &q;
 pBook->getPrice();

 Software *pSoftware;
 Software g(5);
 pSoftware = &g;
 pSoftware ->getPrice();


 productList[0] = pSoftware; // fill it with software, cannot do this.

Is there any way of inserting a subclass into a super classes array. Or should i define the array of pointers as something else.

class definitions below

class Product
{
public:

double price;

double getPrice();

Product::Product(double price){};
};


class Book: public Product
{
public:
Book::Book(double price)
    :Product(price)
{
}
double getPrice();
};

class Software: public Product
{
public:
Software::Software(double price)
    :Product(price)                 // equivalent of super in java?
{
}                                   // code of constructor goes here.
double getPrice();
};
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1  
Is this C or C++? I guess this is obviously C++. Use a std::vector instead of an array –  Falmarri Feb 7 '11 at 17:03
1  
Can you show us the definitions of the Product, Book, and Software classes? You should be able to put all three types of pointers into a Product * array if Book and Software are all subtypes of Product. –  birryree Feb 7 '11 at 17:03
    
@Falmarri it says c++ in the title. –  OVERTONE Feb 7 '11 at 17:13
    
@birryree done. –  OVERTONE Feb 7 '11 at 17:14
    
@OVERTONE: Yes, but you're using arrays instead of std::vector, which is why I asked. –  Falmarri Feb 7 '11 at 17:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As the array is of type Product, you should declare pSoftware as a pointer to Product:

Product *pSoftware = new Software(5);
// ...
productList[0] = pSoftware;
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This should be functionally identical to the OP's original code if Software inherits publicly from Product. –  Alan Feb 7 '11 at 17:14
    
conversion to inaccesible base class product is not allowed. never seen this one before. gonna take a look online. –  OVERTONE Feb 7 '11 at 17:17
    
@Alan: Not quite. This is actually allocating space for the product objects that won't be destroyed when they're out of scope. OP is asking for trouble by assigning references to local variables. –  Falmarri Feb 7 '11 at 17:18

You should use public inheritance:

class Book : public Product {
...
};

[edit]

You should also declare getPrice() as virtual if you want to implement it differently in the child classes. This will make compiler call getPrice() of the right child class when you call getPrice() for a pointer to a Product:

virtual double getPrice();
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It's been a while, but what's the default inheritance type in C++? Should

class Book:Product
{

be

class Book: public Product
{

It's always a good idea to be explicit anyway.

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im here to learn :D thanks for that. im used to using extends in java, didnt know they had to be public. thanks for that –  OVERTONE Feb 7 '11 at 17:24

Can't you just cast the software* to a product* to put it in your array? productList[0] = (Product*)pSoftware;

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