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I am about to start a C# .NET 4.0 project that creates a job scheduler.

  1. The job has no due date, and are potentially long running, up to days.
  2. The job has 3 priorities: idle, normal, critical; from lowest to highest.
  3. New job(s) are continuously being created.
  4. Newer job with higher priority should take precedence over lower priority job even if the old job has been created for a long time.
  5. Each job will be handled by single long running thread.
  6. Job are re-entrant. The state of job is persisted to the database, so it is okay to pause the job or terminate the job thread at anytime.

My plan is to use a semaphore, and set the number of concurrent entries to the number of system cores. A new thread will be created for every jobs in queue, and all thread will be blocked by the semaphore in the beginning.

My problem is to guarantee high priority thread will enter the semaphore first when semaphore calls release() method. Doable?

My second problem is to have a thread that is inside the semaphore to exit when higher priority job thread come to existence and have the exiting job thread go back to the thread queue to wait for the semaphore. Doable?

For those two problems, is semaphore the right approaches? If not what do you suggest?

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Why not use Quartz.Net? –  Dean K. Feb 7 '11 at 18:24
1  
Well, my scheduling scheme is based purely on priority, and certain job needs to be stopped based on new job arrival. Can quartz.net help me here? –  qin Feb 7 '11 at 18:29
1  
Not sure about stopping a running job, but Quartz.Net does have priority based processing. –  Dean K. Feb 7 '11 at 18:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, I would lean more towards something like the following...

First, Start all the threads you want:

for(int i=0; i < Environment.ProcessorCount; i++)
{
    Thread t = new Thread(RunWork);
    // setup thread
    t.Start();
    threads.Add(t);
}

You will need an interface to describe the priority of a task

interface ITask {
    PrioirtyType Prioirty { get; }
    bool Complete { get; }
    void PerformOneUnitOfWork();
}

Then create a Queue management object. This would obviously get more complicated as it may need to sync with your database, etc...

class MyQueue<TJob> where TJob : ITask 
{
    Queue<TJob> high, med, low;
    bool GetNextJob(ref TJob work)
    {
        if(work.Priority == PriorityType.High && !work.Complete)
            return true;
        lock(this)
        {
            if(high.Count > 0)
            {
                Enqueue(work);//requeue to pick back up later
                work = high.Dequeue();
                return true;
            }
            if(work.Priority == PriorityType.Med && !work.Complete)
                return true;
            if(med.Count > 0)
            {
                Enqueue(work);//requeue to pick back up later
                work = med.Dequeue();
                return true;
            }
            if(!work.Complete)
                return true;
            if(low.Count > 0)
            {
                work = low.Dequeue();
                return true;
            }
            work = null;
            return false;
        }

    void Enqueue(TJob work)
    {
        if(work.Complete) return;
        lock(this)
        {
            else if(work.Priority == PriorityType.High) high.Enqueue(work);
            else if(work.Priority == PriorityType.Med) med.Enqueue(work);
            else low.Enqueue(work);
        }
    }
}

And Lastly create your worker thread something like the following:

public void RunWork()
{
    ITask job;
    while(!_shutdown.WaitOne(0))
    {
        if(queue.GetNextJob(ref job))
            job.PerformOneUnitOfWork();
        else
            WaitHandle.WaitAny(new WaitHandle[] { _shutdown, queue.WorkReadyHandle });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is brilliant, somehow I feel this might be what I am looking for. Can you tell me what data type is _shutdown ?? –  qin Feb 7 '11 at 19:31
    
I don't see WorkReadyHandle defined any where on MyQueue class. Am I missing anything? I am new to C# in general. –  qin Feb 7 '11 at 19:37
    
_shutdown is either a Thread or ManualResetEvent - most likely a Thread. I would still prefer TPL over manual thread management, esp. since .Net 4 is referenced. –  IAbstract Feb 7 '11 at 19:42
    
Would TPL be efficient with long running thread, that can potentially go for couple days? –  qin Feb 7 '11 at 19:46
    
I expected _shutdown and WorkReadyHandle to be manual reset events, I would probably put both the shutdown and work-ready handles in the MyQueue class and just access them. It's up to you if you need to shutdown the threads one at a time or not. –  csharptest.net Feb 7 '11 at 20:15

For those two problems, is semaphore the right approaches? If not what do you suggest?

It really depends. Often, it's better to have more than one job per thread, since many (especially long running) work items will spend their time waiting on things other than the CPU. For example, if you are doing work where you're pulling from WCF services, or other related issues, you may spend a lot of your time blocked and idle.

In this case, it might be better to just let your jobs schedule as needed. Using the ThreadPool may be nicer in that type of scenario.

If, however, the jobs are all high CPU, then your approach may be desirable. A priority queue could be used to track the scheduling priority, and decide which job to run.

That being said, I'd probably not use a semaphore for this. While it would work, a single counter (managed via Interlocked.Increment/Decrement) and a ManualResetEvent would work just as well, and be a lot lighter weight.

share|improve this answer
    
Use of a semaphore seems to signal implementation of the Task Parallel Library, in my opinion. Wouldn't TPL and semaphore pretty much work? TPL gives you a lot of control. A hi-priority job would be enqueued (index 0, for instance) pushing lower-priority jobs down. At that point, TPL will let you pause the lowest priority job...??? Or am I misunderstanding something... –  IAbstract Feb 7 '11 at 19:01
    
@IAbstract: TPL could be very useful, though it doesn't have anything built-in for "pause", and semaphone usage is really separate from TPL... –  Reed Copsey Feb 7 '11 at 19:05
    
Right, there is a lot of implementation detail left out...and I wasn't sure if there was really a pause in TPL or not. However, I'm sure it is possible to persist the state of a job, in essence pausing the task. :) –  IAbstract Feb 7 '11 at 19:38

There is a great framework that was ported over from Java to C# check it out

http://quartznet.sourceforge.net/

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