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I want to create a single class that refers to a type of service using an interface. The service can have different implementations. The different implementations will process different types of requests. In the past I would define an interface something like this:

public interface I_Test
{
    public String get(String key, Enum type);
}

and implement it like this:

public class Test_1 implements I_Test
{
    public String get(String key, Enum type)
    {
        Enum_1 t1 = (Enum_1)type;

        switch(t1)
        {
            case NAME:
                return "Garry";
            case DOB:
                return "1966";
            default:
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unkown type [" + type + "]");
        }
    }
}

The good is I can use a different implementation of my interface to meet different needs. The bad is I have to type cast and so have a risk at runtime.

I was hoping that generics could solve this, so I did this:

public interface I_Test<T extends Enum>
{
    public String get(String key, T type);
}

and this:

public class Test_1 implements I_Test<Enum_1>
{
    public String get(String key, Enum_1 type)
    {
        switch(type)
        {
            case NAME:
                return "Garry";
            case DOB:
                return "1966";
            default:
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unkown type [" + type + "]");
        }
    }
}

but when I go to use the thing I get type safety warnings unless I declare my variable with the type I intend to use, like so:

I_Test<Enum_1> t1 = new Test_1();

This really bugs me because the whole point of creating the I_Test interface was so that I could use different implementations but it seems I have to lock in to a particular type at compile time to avoid this warning!

Is there any way to write a reusable interface that uses generics without this annoying warning?

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I don't really understand what your interface does (what does it mean "to process different types of requests", in what context?), but it looks like a misuse of an interface - mainly because your implementation uses switch in place of polymorphism. Looks like your above logic could be done much more easily with Map<K,V> –  davin Feb 7 '11 at 18:59
    
I had to remove sensitive data, should have done a better job of it - sorry for the confusion. What I can say is that the get takes data and a request type. The type of requests is implementation dependent - currently there are 4 supported implementations and well over 30 different request types scattered about them where I work. –  BigMac66 Feb 7 '11 at 19:52
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The point of generics is to ensure that your code is more reliable (as far as type-safety is concerned). With generics, you are able to find out about type incompatibilities at compile-time instead of runtime. When you defined your interface as I_Test<T extends Enum>, you are basically saying that you do need the interface to be genericized according to a specific type. This is why Java is giving you a warning.

You would get the same warning if you did something like this Map myMap = new HashMap<string>();.

In Java, you actually specify the types and they are not inferred from what is on the RHS (unless you do something like Integer i = 1, but that's autoboxing). Since you genericized your interface, when you declare something using that interface, you need to specify the type to use (to genericize).

When you instantiate a generic type, the compiler will translate those types by using something called "type erasure". Here, the compiler removes all information associated with the type parameters and type arguments. Java does this to maintain compatibility with older code that was written before Java had generics.

So I_Test<Enum_1> is actually translated to the raw type I_Test during compilation. Using a raw type is generally considered to be a bad practice (hence, the "annoying warning"). The compiler is telling you that it does not have enough information to perform type-checking and therefore it cannot ensure type-safety (because you used a raw type).

To learn more about generics, take a look at the following:

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Thanks for your comment. I actually am familiar with most of what you said. I am trying to find a sensible way to avoid the warning short of suppressing it - as a general rule I think warnings serve a valid purpose and don't like suppressing them. Looks like this may be an exception to that rule... :) –  BigMac66 Feb 7 '11 at 20:02
    
If your interface/class uses generics, there is no way to suppress the warning. You will get it if you use the raw type :). The only time you should ignore the warning is if you can guarantee that the type is the type you expect. That is, if it is not possible for it to be any other type. –  Vivin Paliath Feb 7 '11 at 20:08
    
Ahh that is my problem and why I turned to generics. I am a senior developer and some of the less experienced developers are mixing things that should not be mixed. I understand they are trying to reuse code but they are not being careful. While this is not a sure fire solution to that problem, I think it will help in enough cases to make it worth my while to adopt generics... Thanks again for your help. –  BigMac66 Feb 7 '11 at 20:35
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Generics is about compile time warnings. If you don't want them, don't use them.

Having said that, you can create different, non-generic subinterfaces, for example:

public interface Enum_1_Test extends I_Test<Enum_1> {
  ...
}

And then declare your class as

public class Test_1 implements Enum_1_Test

But I'm not convinced this is very useful. As a rule of thumb, you want to use generics if you have one implementation that works for many input types and use the good old polymorphism if you want a separate implementation for each input type.

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The raw I_Test supports any enum type as argument while the Test_1 implementation only supports a limited subset (Enum_1), this is because Test_1 is specified as implementing I_Test only for one enum type.

Here is an example why the compiler issues a warning, the following code compiles since the raw type of I_Test accepts any enum, however as Test_1 only supports Enum_1 it will throw a class cast exception.

enum MyEnum{A}
I_Test t1 = new Test_1();//warning here
t1.get("",MyEnum.A);//Exception at runtime, but compiles fine

If you specify the generic type it will cause a compilation error, this is preferred to runtime exceptions.

enum MyEnum{A}
I_Test<Enum_1> t1 = new Test_1();
t1.get("",MyEnum.A);//Does not compile
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