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I'm having a problem getting TryParse to work correctly for me. I have a list of values that I am almost assured are valid (as they come from another component in our system) but I would like to make sure there is proper error handling in place.

Here is an example list of my values:

20.00
20.00
-150.00

And here is the method I originally wrote:

 private decimal CalculateValue(IEnumerable<XElement> summaryValues)
        {
            decimal totalValue = 0;

            foreach (XElement xElement in summaryValues)
            {
                decimal successful;
                Decimal.TryParse(xElement.Value, out successful);
                if (successful > 0)
                    totalValue += Decimal.Parse(xElement.Value);
            }
            return totalValue;
        }

The variable 'successful' was returning false for -150.00, so I added NumberStyles:

private decimal CalculateValue(IEnumerable<XElement> summaryValues)
        {
            decimal totalValue = 0;

            foreach (XElement xElement in summaryValues)
            {
                decimal successful;
                Decimal.TryParse(xElement.Value, NumberStyles.AllowLeadingSign, null, out successful);
                if (successful > 0)
                    totalValue += Decimal.Parse(xElement.Value, NumberStyles.AllowLeadingSign);
            }
            return totalValue;
        }

However, now that I have the NumberStyles in there, none of the numbers will parse! I feel good about having IFormatProvider set to null as this is all within our system. Does anyone see what I may be doing wrong?

Thanks in advance, Jeannine

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2  
Why are you parsing it twice? –  SLaks Feb 7 '11 at 18:59
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The other answers have got the right idea with regard to the proper way to use Decimal.TryParse. However, if I were writing the method in question, I'd use LINQ to work with LINQ-to-XML objects:

private decimal CalculateValue(IEnumerable<XElement> summaryValues)
{
    return summaryValues
        .Sum(el =>
             {
                 decimal value;
                 if (Decimal.TryParse(el.Value, out value))
                     return value;
                 return 0M;
             });
}

This version works the exact same way, but it uses the Enumerable.Sum method to calculate the total. All I have to supply is an inline function that extracts decimal values from an XElement.

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Thanks, I ended up using this code. –  Jeannine Feb 7 '11 at 20:30
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Others are explaining how to do it right, but not really explaining what you're doing wrong.

Where you're using "successful" above isn't the success value, it's the actual number that is being parsed. So if you're parsing "-150.00" of course successful will be negative. The out value of TryParse is the actual parsed value and the boolean indicating whether the process was successful or not is the returned value. Using what you have to help understand would be something like:

string inputValue = "-150.00";
decimal numericValue;
bool isSucessful = Decimal.TryParse(inputValue , out numericValue);

In this case, isSuccessful will be TRUE, numericValue will be -150. When you're using user-provided values instead of the hardcoded one I used above you'll want to check:

if(isSuccessful)
{
    // Do something with numericValue since we know it to be a valid decimal
}
else
{
    // Inform User, throw exception, etc... as appropriate, Don't use numericValue because we know it's wrong.
}
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Yes, this was the root of the problem. Thank you for edumacating me. :) –  Jeannine Feb 7 '11 at 20:30
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I would suggest you to tell XElement which node value it should look for as in:

XElement.Element("nodename").Value

Instead of XElement.Value. at least that is what I would do :)

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your successful is going to be negative for a negative value being parsed. your if (successful > 0) is what's tripping you up.

If they are almost positively going to be valid values, try using Convert.ToDecimal:

decimal val = Convert.ToDecimal(xElement.Value);

Otherwise, change your logic a bit to be more like:

decimal val;
if (Decimal.TryParse(xElement.Value, out val)){
  // valid number
}
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This is not how you are supposed to use TryParse.

TryParse returns a boolean (true/false), so your code above should be:

private decimal CalculateValue(IEnumerable<XElement> summaryValues)
        {
            decimal totalValue = 0;

            foreach (XElement xElement in summaryValues)
            {
                decimal valueReturned;
                bool successful = Decimal.TryParse(xElement.Value, out valueReturned);
                if (successful)
                    totalValue += valueReturned;
            }
            return totalValue;
        }

or more succinctly,

private decimal CalculateValue(IEnumerable<XElement> summaryValues)
        {
            decimal totalValue = 0;

            foreach (XElement xElement in summaryValues)
            {
                decimal valueReturned;
                if (Decimal.TryParse(xElement.Value, out valueReturned))
                    totalValue += valueReturned;
            }
            return totalValue;
        }
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1  
if(!Decimal.TryParse(/*derp*/) throw new InvalidOperationException("OMG WTF LOL") –  Will Feb 7 '11 at 19:02
    
@Will In this example he should have an exception like this, even if he reasonably trusts the source. But you could have a situation where you expect and want to silently ignore strings that don't parse. –  Justin Morgan Feb 7 '11 at 19:17
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