Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For our newsletter application, we want to hide our application directory by using a virtual directory on the main website. So for instance, our app is at app.example.com and the viewer is at app.example.com/article/view/id. We would like to use something like example.com/newsletter/id as a link in the newsletter for the public to view. Is this possible? If so, how?

This is so we can hide the structure of the application from the readers so people don't start browsing the structure of our application. Yes, we do have security on the application.

I believe we are on IIS 6.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Virtual directories are just containers for web applications. So a virtual directory corresponds to an ASP.NET (MVC) application. They are mapped to a physical location of the application and belong to a particular web site. When you say app.example.com you have already mapped this domain to some web site in IIS, so you could only have sub virtual directories: app.example.com/app1, app.example.com/app2, ... But if you have a site which is mapped to the example.com domain then you could have virtual directories which correspond to example.com/app1, example.com/app2, ... And of course inside each app you could have routing which corresponds to controller/action/id.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I wasn't sure if there was anything special to do or not. Thanks! –  Mike Wills Feb 7 '11 at 19:58
    
Looking at this more. I am confused. Can you clarify this some? –  Mike Wills Feb 7 '11 at 21:01
    
@Mike Wills, what confuses you? I am not sure in what sense I could clarify this more. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 7 '11 at 21:08
    
So I can tell IIS that /article/view/id is /newsletter/id? –  Mike Wills Feb 7 '11 at 21:18
    
@Mike, why do you want to tell IIS something like this? That's the application responsibility and the way you define your routes in Global.asax, isn't it? Of course there are ISAPI extensions available for IIS which would allow you to rewrite requests but quite honestly you have the ASP.NET MVC routing at your disposal, so why would you want to do some stuff like this? –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 7 '11 at 21:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

We decided to write a page that pulled the html from myapp.domain.com to domain.com/app.aspx. We didn't want to mess with the Global file at this time.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.