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This question is about how to best name RSpec example groups and examples in English.

I understand that in RSpec, describe, context (which are functionally equivalent) and it are supposed to give you complete sentences. So for example,

describe "Log-in controller" do
  context "with logged-in user" do
    it "redirects to root" do
      ...
    end
  end
end

reads Log-in controller with logged-in user redirects to root. Awesome.

But in my application, where I need to test all components on an ajaxy page (using Capybara), I tend to have example groups like this:

describe "blog post" do
  describe "content" do
    it "is displayed"
  end
  describe "comment" do
    it "is displayed"
    describe "editing" do
      it "works"   # successful comment editing
      it "requires logged-in user"  # error case 1
      it "requires non-empty body"  # error case 2
    end
  end
  describe "comment form" do
    it "works"  # successful comment submission
    it "requires valid email address"  # error case 1
    it "requires non-empty body"  # error case 2
  end
end

I see two anti-patterns here:

  1. The nested describes don't read as sentences. Of course one could put an 's:

    describe "blog post" do
      describe "'s content" do
        it "is displayed"
      end
    end
    

    Or one could put a colon after "blog post:". Or ideally, I would write

    describe "blog post" do
      its "content" do
        it "is displayed"
      end
    end
    

    but that's not possible because its is about attribute access, and I just have strings here.

    Is there a better way to deal with the "page components" problem?

  2. For the functionality, the successful cases (for functionality like comment submission) are simply marked as it "works". At least this is concise and simple -- I find it slightly preferable to it "can be submitted and causes a comment to be added", because that just forces me to make up verbiage for something that is obvious. But is there a nicer, more "natural" way to do this?

Suggestions for how to restructure the example example-group ;) above would be appreciated!

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You shouldn't really think about having examples be grammatically correct. It's fine if your test reads 'blog post content is displayed' without the 's. The test is readable and simple. What you really want is to be able to understand what is failing when a test doesn't work.

With regards to your second point, 'it works' is usually not descriptive enough. It doesn't let someone else know what you mean by 'works'. If you are actually testing many things it's best to split your examples up, for instance:

describe 'blog post' do
  context 'creating a comment' do
    it 'should require a logged-in user'
    it 'should require a non-empty body'
    it 'should require a valid email address'
    it 'should create a new comment'
    it 'should be submittable'
  end
end
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Interesting! I'm not sure if I'm convinced by your example for splitting up it "works": "Should be submittable" is really not an interesting test (it just requires a button), and things like "creates a new comment", "the new comment has the right author", etc. are usually only splittable by duplicating code and losing performance (which really hurts for Selenium). So for the successful case, I usually apply KISS and just exercise the functionality followed by a bunch expectations against things I care about. I really don't see the maintainability of my specs going up by splitting those. –  Jo Liss Feb 8 '11 at 2:49
    
My pseudo-code is only meant as a guide. 'should be submittable' was just an example of how you should split up 'can be submitted and causes a comment to be created'. My point is that you want a different test condition for each test. Once you start adding 'and' to your descriptions, they require splitting. If you are testing with Silenium I don't recommend going for 100% coverage. You can probably accomplish an equivalent level of coverage with model and controller tests first. If you are worried about performance and duplication, create a background condition to avoid these issues. –  Pan Thomakos Feb 8 '11 at 3:31
    
I'm not really convinced that splitting up my tests will make them more maintainable. When you have something like "submit a comment, check it got dynamically added through JS, check it has the right author, check it has a date, check it is editable, check it still is on the page after a page reload", are you actually advocating to split that into several tests (rather than having a concise string of expectations)? Btw, what do you mean by "background condition"? :speed => :slow kind of metadata? –  Jo Liss Feb 8 '11 at 14:36
    
I am actually advocating adding separate tests, because then if a test breaks you know what went wrong. If all your tests are grouped together like this you don't know what's not working if a test fails. If you are in the mood to keep all the tests together since it's a Silenium test, making the title simpler: 'should allow users to add comments' works as well. By background condition I mean a function that does the setup, like having a user create a comment, and then separate tests that check that the conditions succeeded: correct author, correct date, correct title... –  Pan Thomakos Feb 8 '11 at 15:45
    
Cool, I'll give it a whirl next time I touch my tests. Thanks for your insights! –  Jo Liss Feb 9 '11 at 4:38
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