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Is it possible to generate different random number, every time loop runs. For example, i have:

for (int t=0;t<10;t++)
{
    int random_x;
    srand ( time(NULL) );
    random_x = rand() % 100;
    cout<<"\nRandom X = "<<random_x;
} 

But the problem is, it generates same random number everytime. Is it possible to generate different random numbers everytime loop runs?

IS there any possibility to reset random number initiallization as well?

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3  
Reading the documentation for srand() might be useful. –  Crazy Eddie Feb 7 '11 at 21:22
1  
Just to make Noah's comment at bit more helpful: cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/srand :) –  TommyA Feb 7 '11 at 21:25
1  
possible duplicate of Always repeated numbers given by rand() –  Jens Gustedt Feb 7 '11 at 21:48
1  
+1 for "same random number every time" (lol!) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 1 '12 at 17:43
    
Removed the [c] tag, since the question has "C++" in the title. –  Mr.C64 Apr 15 at 11:29

12 Answers 12

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Don't use srand inside the loop, use it only once, e.g. at the start of main(). And srand() is exactly how you reset this.

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I did this, but it changes random value only once now. As forexample it generates 15, 23, 23, 23, 23. Now what shall I do? –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:18
6  
If you really put it at the start of main(), you wouldn't be getting that sequence. –  etarion Feb 7 '11 at 21:31
    
Still if u execute program more than once with in second, random number sequence will be the same –  raj_gt1 Apr 10 '13 at 11:27

You are getting the same random number each time, because you are setting a seed inside the loop. Even though you're using time(), it only changes once per second, so if your loop completes in a second (which it likely will), you'll get the same seed value each time, and the same initial random number.

Move the srand() call outside the loop (and call it only once, at the start of your app) and you should get random "random" numbers.

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3  
Moving it outside the loop might not be enough, as the loop might be called more than once a second. –  Mark Ransom Feb 7 '11 at 21:15
1  
Oh, good point -- clarified. –  payne Feb 7 '11 at 21:16
    
I did this, but it changes random value only once now. As forexample it generates 15, 23, 23, 23, 23. Now what shall I do? –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:18
    
Also note that srand() is very expensive compared to rand(). In glibc this is guaranteed by the fact that in addition to the initial setup done by srand() it calls rand() 300+ times to stir the pot. –  Ben Jackson Feb 7 '11 at 21:38
    
As a sanity check, take off the % 100 and look at the raw values returned by rand. Using the % operator to map into a range of values may result in a non-normal distribution depending on the RNG being used, as the low-order bits may not be entirely random. A better method is to do something like val = min + (int) ((double) rand() / RAND_MAX * (max - min + 1); to map into the range [min,max]. –  John Bode Feb 7 '11 at 21:46

Try moving the seed srand outside the loop like so:

srand ( time(NULL) );
for (int t=0;t<10;t++)
{
    int random_x;
    random_x = rand() % 100;
    cout<< "\nRandom X = "<<random_x;
} 

As Mark Ransom says in the comment, moving the seed outside the loop will only help if the loop is not residing in a function you are calling several times.

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Moving it outside the loop might not be enough, as the loop might be called more than once a second. –  Mark Ransom Feb 7 '11 at 21:16
    
I did this, but it changes random value only once now. As forexample it generates 15, 23, 23, 23, 23. Now what shall I do? –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:17

I had this same problem for days. Keeping srand() out of the loop is a +. Also, dont assign rand() % 100 to any variable. Simply cout rand() % 100 in the loop. Try this:

    srand (time(NULL));
    (int t=0;t<10;t++)
    {
    cout << rand() % 100 << endl;
    } 
share|improve this answer

Stop seeding the generator every time. Pull the srand call out of the loop

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I did this, but it changes random value only once now. As forexample it generates 15, 23, 23, 23, 23. Now what shall I do? –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:20
1  
Did you really need to write the same comment on every answer? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 1 '12 at 17:43

Move the srand call to the start of the program. As you have it now, the time might be the same between two consecutive calls, so the random number generator will start again at the same spot.

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I did this, but it changes random value only once now. As forexample it generates 15, 23, 23, 23, 23. Now what shall I do? –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:30

You need to extract the initilization of time() out of the for loop.

Here is an example that will output in the windows console expected (ahah) random number.

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include "time.h"
int main(int argc, char*argv[])
{
    srand ( time(NULL) );
    for (int t = 0; t < 10; t++)
    {
        int random_x;

        random_x = rand() % 100;
        std::cout << "\nRandom X = " << random_x << std::endl;
    }
    Sleep(50000);
    return 0;
}
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it says Sleep identifer not found –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:19
    
Did you include windows.h ? This piece of code works fine for me on VS2008. –  Xavier V. Feb 7 '11 at 21:21
    
I used this, but it says "The application has requested the run time to terminate it in unusual way –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:26
    
To get the numbers on the windows console using this code, be sure to create your project as a "Win32 Console Application". Then, copy/pasting this code should work. –  Xavier V. Feb 7 '11 at 21:28
    
it is running in "Win32 Console Application", it runs for few values of loop, but thn it gives error. Actually my code underneath it is lengthy as well –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:52

The time function probably returns the same value during each iteration of the loop.

Try initializing the random seed before the loop.

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I did this, but it changes random value only once now. As forexample it generates 15, 23, 23, 23, 23. Now what shall I do? –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:30

Every iteration you are resetting the sequence of pseudorandom numbers because you are calling srand with the same seed (since the call to time is so frequent). Either use a different seed, or call srand once before you enter the loop.

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I did this, but it changes random value only once now. As forexample it generates 15, 23, 23, 23, 23. Now what shall I do? –  bijlikamasla Feb 7 '11 at 21:29
1  
Yes we can read. You've posted that in 5 different places. –  Marlon Feb 8 '11 at 2:19

If you have randoms early on in the program you could multiply the loop variable by the time - to give a better distribution. For example

for (int t = 0; t < 10; t++){
        srand(time(NULL)*t);
        random =  rand() % GetScreenWidth();

}
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Do not use rand(); use new C++11 facilities (e.g. std::mt19937, std::uniform_int_distribution, etc.) instead.

You can use code like this (live here on Ideone):

#include <iostream>
#include <random>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    // Random seed
    random_device rd;

    // Initialize Mersenne Twister pseudo-random number generator
    mt19937 gen(rd());

    // Generate pseudo-random numbers
    // uniformly distributed in range (1, 100)
    uniform_int_distribution<> dis(1, 100);

    // Generate ten pseudo-random numbers
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        int randomX = dis(gen);
        cout << "\nRandom X = " << randomX;
    }
}

P.S.

Consider watching this video from Going Native 2013 conference for more details about rand()-related problems:

rand() Considered Harmful

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Don't know men. I found the best way for me after testing different ways like 10 minutes. ( Change the numbers in code to get big or small random number.)

    int x;
srand ( time(NULL) );
x = rand() % 1000 * rand() % 10000 ;
cout<<x;
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