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I'm using C++, Visual Studio 2010 Premium on Windows 7, and in my application I have a std::string variable that fails on append :( ...

The situation is, the string variable contains a huge amount of chars appended at different times, first time I add for example 7609 bytes, second time 8184 and finally 1463, something like

std::string str; 
long bytesRead; 
char buffer[BUFFER_SIZE];

do { 
   bytesRead = ReadChars(buffer, BUFFER_SIZE -1); 
   buffer[bytesRead] = 0; // I omitted this line before, but it was in the original code
   if (bytesRead > 0)    
       str += buffer; // I'm already taking care of the char 0 at the end :)
} while (bytesRead > 0); 

so every time I call += (or append, same result) it append an extra string (last 7 or 8 chars from original buffer) for instance

original buffer ends "string appended"

after append, str ends "string appendedappended"

does anyone knows if this is a known issue? or maybe if I missed something

I put this into the comments down there, but maybe better if I put it here too

ReadChars: read a bounch of chars and return the number of bytes read

bytesRead: if read, it is > 0... so is ok to treat buffer as ASCIIZ,

I tried with append function but obtain same behavior ( like this str.append(buffer); )

Regards Jorge

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1  
How are you taking care of the char \0 at the end of the buffer? That looks like the results if you didn't. Please show your code without omitting anything important. –  David Thornley Feb 7 '11 at 21:28
2  
Can you post the implementation of ReadChars? The bug is almost certainly in that function's handling of buffer –  JaredPar Feb 7 '11 at 21:29
    
You are probably putting the null char at the wrong offset in buffer –  Marlon Feb 7 '11 at 21:31
    
I added char 0 to the sample as you suggest, if you are wondering, yes it was in the original code :) –  Jorge Feb 7 '11 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is this snippet your actual code? What do you mean with "taking care of the char 0"?

do { 
   bytesRead = ReadChars(buffer, BUFFER_SIZE); 
   if (bytesRead > 0)
       str += buffer; // I'm already taking care of the char 0 at the end :)
} while (bytesRead > 0);

In your example, you always append the whole buffer to the string, effectively ignoring bytesRead. So std::string will read from buffer until a NULL byte is found -- which could cause overflows and is certainly not what you want.

You have to tell how many bytes from buffer to append. Try the following instead:

do { 
   bytesRead = ReadChars(buffer, BUFFER_SIZE); 
   if (bytesRead > 0)
       str.append(buffer, buffer + bytesRead);
} while (bytesRead > 0);
share|improve this answer
    
or buffer[bytesRead] = '\0'; ---> str += buffer; –  Marlon Feb 7 '11 at 21:32
    
Yeah, unless bytesRead == BUFFER_SIZE :) –  Ferdinand Beyer Feb 7 '11 at 21:35
2  
@Marlon: Why perform an additional write operation when you could get away with only reading? Also, when passing random access iterators (which char* is) to std::string::append(), the function can pre-calculate the length of the sequence added, while it can't if you just pass a single char*. And if it knows the required length beforehand, it could pre-allocate the memory, rather than growing increasingly until it finds '\0'. Anyway, assuming that ReadChars() isn't supposed to append '\0' itself, this is, IMO, the best solution. –  sbi Feb 7 '11 at 21:49
    
Is not the exact code, I modify it to make it simple, just an example.. but let me explain a little more, ReadChars: read a bounch of chars and at the end we have char 0, bytesRead: if read, it is > 0... so ok to treat buffer as ASCIIZ, I tried with append function but obtain same behavior –  Jorge Feb 7 '11 at 21:52
    
In fact I didn't use append like you did, I used like this str.append(buffer); I'll try and let you know, thanks –  Jorge Feb 7 '11 at 21:58

You said you already took care of the "0" at the end... are you sure you didn't remove the space character from the end of each string you are trying to append?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I'm sure, I just simplify the code to post here :) –  Jorge Feb 7 '11 at 21:48

Without information about ReadChars this looks exactly like buffer doesn't get null terminated and std::string is appending character from the buffer until it hits a random 0 in memory.

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well is not exactly random, it is always 7 or 8 chars from the appended information –  Jorge Feb 7 '11 at 22:05

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