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How do you write your own custom exception class.

I'm trying to write my own exception class that throws an InvalidTestScore.

// george beazer
import java.util.Scanner;

public class TestScores{
    public static void main(String[]args){
                int numTests = 0;
                double[] grade = new double[numTests];
                double totGrades = 0;
                double average;   

                Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
                System.out.print("How many tests do you have? ");

                numTests = keyboard.nextInt();
                grade = new double[(int) numTests];

                for (int index = 0; index < grade.length; index++){
                        System.out.print("Enter grade for Test " + (index + 1) + ": ");
                        grade[index] = keyboard.nextDouble();        

                        if (grade[index] < 0 || grade[index]> 100){
                                try {
                                  throw new InvalidTestScore();

                                } catch (InvalidTestScore e) 
                                {

                                    e.printStackTrace();

                                }
                        }
                }


                for (int index = 0; index < grade.length; index++){
                        totGrades += grade[index];
                }

                average = totGrades/grade.length;
                System.out.print("The average is: " + average);
        }

}
share|improve this question
    
Why is there so much space between the lines? Much easier to read if condensed (same thing I say for dissertations, but they make us do double-spacing anyway). –  Chris Dennett Feb 7 '11 at 22:06
    
possible duplicate of How can I write an Exception by myself? –  fglez Apr 3 '13 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

Just extend Exception:

public class InvalidTestScoreException extends Exception {

   public InvalidTestScoreException() {
      super("Invalid test score");
   }

   public InvalidTestScoreException(String message) {
      super(message);
   }

   public InvalidTestScoreException(Throwable throwable) {
      super(throwable);
   }
}

On another note, checked exceptions are very attractive initially. But you should avoid their unnecessary use. Checked exceptions are used to force a programmer to deal with the exceptional condition (which makes the code more reliable since the exceptional condition cannot be ignored).

Also, a checked exception is used when the condition is recoverable. This means that when you use a checked exception, there is a reasonable assumption that the programmer can recover from this exception.

Use runtime exceptions to indicate programming errors. For example, you can use an IllegalArgumentException if a precondition for your method is violated. Considering your example, this exception may make more sense.

If you can use an appropriate standard-exception in place of a checked exception, do so instead of creating a new exception that mimics existing functionality (DRY).

share|improve this answer
    
When I add that to my code i get a error. –  user599272 Feb 7 '11 at 22:13
    
What kind of error? Where are you adding it? –  Vivin Paliath Feb 7 '11 at 22:14
    
public class InvalidTestScoreException extends Exception { public InvalidTestScoreException() { super("Invalid test score"); } public InvalidTestScoreException(String message) { super(message); } public InvalidTestScore(Throwable throwable) { super(throwable); } } –  user599272 Feb 7 '11 at 22:17
    
I was a little too quick on my last edit and I wrote InvalidTestScore instead of InvalidTestScoreException. I've fixed it. –  Vivin Paliath Feb 7 '11 at 22:18
    
I get error invalid method declaration; return type required –  user599272 Feb 7 '11 at 22:18
class MyCustomException extends Exception
{
    public MyCustomException(String message)
    {
        super(message);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You simply extend the Exception class. Like this:

class InvalidTestScore extends Exception {
}

Also, here are a few useful constructors that I usually implement.

    public InvalidTestScore(String msg) {
        super(msg);
    }

    public InvalidTestScore(Throwable cause) {
        super(cause);
    }

Here is the official trail on exception handling: The Java Tutorials: Lesson: Exceptions

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