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I'm implementing a class that is responsible for all my HTTP requests from the Blackberry. I have around 10 or so screens that use this class to query a web service and get data from it. What would be the standard pattern to use in this case?

Currently I have it setup as follows -

public class NetworkAccessClass
{

    public NetworkAccessClass(String url, String methodName, Vector paramNames, Vector paramValues, MainScreen screen) {
        // perform inits
    }

    public void run() {
        // Get Data
        if(screen.instanceOf(LoginScreen)) {
            ((LoginScreen) screen).requestSucceded(responseData);
        }
        // So on for all 10 screens.
        catch() {
            ((LoginScreen) screen).requestFailed(errorCode);
            // So on for all 10 screens.
        }
    }

}

It works, but doesn't look right, and if a single screen has multiple types network requests, I'm being forced to add a flag to keep track of which function it's supposed to call back.

Is there a better way to do this?

Thanks,
Teja.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use a callback interface, e.g. ResponseHandler:

public class NetworkAccessClass
{

    public interface ResponseHandler {
        void requestSucceeded(ResponseData responseData);
        void requestFailed(ErrorCode errorCode);
    }

    public NetworkAccessClass(
        String url,
        String methodName,
        Vector paramNames,
        Vector paramValues,
        ResponseHandler responseHandler) {
        // perform inits
    }

    public void run() {
        // Get Data
        try {
            ...
            responseHandler.requestSuceeded(responseData);
        catch() {
            responseHandler.requestFailed(errorCode);
        }
    }
}

This hopefully decouples your NetworkAccessClass from knowing about all the screens. Then either your screens implement NetworkAccessClass.ResponseHandler or they pass an adapter handler (anonymous inner class) to call the proper methods on the screen, e.g.

class LoginScreen {
    ...
        new NetworkAccessClass(url, methodName, paramNames, paramValues,
            new ResponseHandler() {
                @Override
                void requestSucceeded(ResponseData responseData) {
                    LoginScreen.this.handleLoginSuccess(responseData);
                }
                @Override
                void requestFailed(ErrorCode errorCode) {
                    LoginScreen.this.handleLoginFailure(errorCode);
                }
    }
    ...
}
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You could use a listener, which is a simple interface the network class would call back whenever something interesting happens :

public interface NetworkListener {
    void requestSucceeded(byte[] responseData);
    void requestFailed(int errorCode);
}

public class NetworkAccess {
    // ...

    public void run() {
        // Get Data
        if (successful) {
            fireSucess(responseData);
        }
        catch(SomeException e) {
            fireFailure(errorCode);
        }
    }

    public void addNetworkListener(NetworkListener listener) {
        // add listener to list of listeners
    }

    private void fireSuccess(byte[] responseData) {
        for (NetworkListener l : listeners) {
            l.requestSucceeded(responseData);
        }
    }

    // ...
}

public class LoginScreen {
    private void foo() {
        NetworkAccess access = new NetworkAccess(...);
        access.addNetworkListener(new NetworkListener() {
            public void requestSucceeded(byte[] responseData) {
                 // do what you want
            }
            public void requestFailed(int errorCode) {
                 // do what you want
            }
        });
    }
}

This is known as the Observable/observer pattern. The observable notifies its observers when something happens, but without having to know their exact type. The listsner class decouples the two parties.

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