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I've programmed this solution for the exercise from section 11.4 (Looping Exercise):

(defun texinfo-index-dfns-in-par ()
  "Create an index entry at the beginning of the paragraph for every '@dfn'."
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (forward-paragraph)
    (let ((bound (point)))
      (backward-paragraph)
      (let ((insert-here (point)))
        (while (search-forward "@dfn{" bound t)
          (let* ((start (point))
                 (end (1- (search-forward "}" bound)))
                 (dfn (buffer-substring start end)))
            (save-excursion
              (goto-char insert-here)
              (newline)
              (setq insert-here (point))
              (insert "@cindex " dfn)
              (while (< insert-here (line-beginning-position))
                (join-line))
              (end-of-line)
              (setq insert-here (point))
              (forward-paragraph)
              (setq bound (point)))))))))

Though it's working, it feels much to convoluted to me. I'd like to know how this code could be simplified. I'm also interested in other possible improvements.

Edit:

Tyler's answer was great. With narrowing I could write a much shorter and cleaner version:

(defun texinfo-index-dfns-in-par ()
  "Create an index entry at the beginning of the paragraph for every '@dfn'."
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (mark-paragraph)
    (save-restriction
      (narrow-to-region (point) (mark))
      (while (search-forward "@dfn{" nil t)
        (let ((start (point))
              (end (1- (search-forward "}"))))
          (save-excursion
            (goto-char (point-min))
            (insert "\n@cindex " (buffer-substring start end))
            (while (> (line-number-at-pos) 2) (join-line))
            (narrow-to-region (line-end-position) (point-max))))))))
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One thing to look at is narrowing. You can use narrowing to get around a lot of the bouncing back and forth you're doing.

(mark-paragraph)
(narrow-to-region)

Will limit the scope of your function to the current paragraph and move point to the beginning. You can then start your forward search without worrying about moving past the current paragraph. When you're done,

(widen)

restores the rest of the buffer to view.

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1  
Thank you very much. Narrowing did really help a lot. I'm also using a second narrow-to-region to keep track of where to insert. Only things I've changed are that I'm using save-restriction instead of widen, in case some other narrowing was in place before the command was called, and I had to do (narrow-to-region (point) (mark)) to narrow to the selected region. –  Rörd Feb 8 '11 at 6:31
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You could replace your search-forwards and buffer-substring with an re-search-forward and match-string (note: untested):

(while (re-search-forward "@dfn{\\([^}]+\\)}" nil t)
  (save-excursion
    (goto-char (point-min))
    (insert "\n@cindex " (match-string 1))
    (while (> (line-number-at-pos) 2) (join-line))
    (narrow-to-region (line-end-position) (point-max))))
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Thanks, it works. I had already thought about that myself, but not implemented it yet because I'm still struggling with Emacs' regex syntax (i.e. which special characters need escaping and which not, what kinds of character classes are supported and how to specify them). –  Rörd Feb 10 '11 at 0:38
1  
@Rörd Try M-x re-builder - really helps you figure out the res. –  Trey Jackson Feb 10 '11 at 6:06
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