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I'm fooling around with the FileSystemWatcher in 4.0. I find this very useful but am getting caught in a loop. I'm trying to monitor whenever an ini is changed and change it back to the correct default (long story) however the change event copying over the new file is causing it to drop into a loop ... Any Ideas > ? I played around with the idea of deleting and recreating thefile to avoid triggering the changed event but this leads to another set of issues with the program that I'd rather avoid. Also I'd imagine I could overwrite the text but this also poses the same issue. Thanks in advance for the help

  static void Main() { Watch (@"\\NoFault2010\Lexis\Data\Setup\", "tmconfig.ini", true); }

        static void Watch (string path, string filter, bool includeSubDirs)
        {
            using (var watcher = new FileSystemWatcher (path, filter))
            {

                watcher.Changed += FileChanged;

                watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;

                Console.WriteLine("Do Not Close ... \n\nThis is a Temporary Configuration Manager for Time Matters ... \n\n\nI'm Listening ............");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }

    static void FileChanged (object o, FileSystemEventArgs e)
    {
        string _right_stuff = @"\\NOFAULT2010\Lexis\Data\Templates\Programs\tmconfig.ini";
        string _working = @"\\NOFAULT2010\Lexis\Data\Setup\tmconfig.ini";

        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000);

        File.Copy(_right_stuff, _working, true);

        Console.WriteLine("File {0} has been {1}", e.FullPath, e.ChangeType);
        MAIL_IT("SQLMail@lcjlawfirm.com", "TM Master.INI has been altered", "Check the Master INI and Yell At Ecopy Guy " + e.ChangeType + e.FullPath);

    }

How would I unsubscribe from the event to avoid entering into this loop.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've written an application that depends on filesystemwatcher - and also, sometimes the fsw handler makes a change to a file. I approached it in two ways - the first was to take the view that my code would be very quick in changing the file - so I did

fsw.EnableRaisingEvents = false; 
//make my change
fsw.EnableRaisingEvents = true; 

However, if you feel that other files might get changed during that time, you could log the time that you make the change and store that data somewhere...

say, Dictionary mapFileNameTimeChanged ...here you could store the file name...so in your handler you could do something like....

fsw_Changed(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
    lock (m_mapFileNameChanged)
    {
        if (m_mapFileNameChanged.ContainsKey(e.FullPath))
        {
            FileInfo fileInfo = new FileInfo(e.FullPath);
            if (fileInfo.LastAccessTime == m_mapFileNameChanged[e.FullPath]
            {
                return;//not been changed since you last did something with it....
            }
        }
        else
        {
            m_mapFileNameChanged.Remove(e.FullPath);//discard this now..it has changed since you last looked at it...need to look at it again!
        }
    }

    //do things in your event handler...
    lock (m_mapFileNameChanged)
    {
        // copy or change the file here...
        FileInfo fileInfo = new FileInfo(e.FullPath);
        m_mapFileNameChanged[strFullPathToFile] = fileInfo.LastAccessTime;
    }
}
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To temporarily disable the event while you're fiddling with the file yourself:

static void FileChanged (object o, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{  
    watcher.Changed -= FileChanged; 

    ... correct the file here...

    watcher.Changed += FileChanged; 
}

Alternatively, you can use a guard variable to detect reentrant calls:

static bool reentrant = false;
static void FileChanged (object o, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{  
    if (reentrant)
        return;

    reentrant = true;

    ... correct the file here...

    reentrant = false;
}

Note that you will also want to do exception handling within the method or your file watcher may become permanently disabled if a problem occurs.

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You could add a boolean (again at the class level) that you could use to track whether the changes were caused by you, and if so, just immediately exit your FileChanged method, ie:

static bool inEdit;
static void FileChanged (object o, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
    if (inEdit)
        return;
    inEdit = true;

    // Do processing

    inEdit = false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-0.5: there may be a race in here that would make not work. If there's a delay in delivering events (e.g. they're queued), then the change event would be posted after FileChanged() has exited (and inEdit has been returned to false). –  payne Feb 8 '11 at 0:47

Unsubscribe is easy, so I wonder if that was the question:

watcher.Changed -= FileChanged

Also, I would create some object to be SynchronizationObject for watcher. There is a problem that by default watcher raises events in new thread, and thus if you unsubscribe after new thread is created, you might run into the problems.

Also of note that FileSystemWatcher may raises multiple events for something you consider as single event, and it might influence functioning of your program.

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If you make the watcher a class variable instead of a local variable, then your FileChanged method should be able to access it. Then you should be able to do something like

static void FileChanged (object o, FileSystemEventArgs e) 
{
     watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = false;
     // Edit the file here
     watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
}
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