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I'm learning new tricks all the time and I'm always on the lookout for better ideas.

I have this rather ugly method. How would you clean it up?

def self.likesit(user_id, params)

  game_id = params[:game_id]
  videolink_id = params[:videolink_id]
  like_type = params[:like_type]

  return false if like_type.nil?

  if like_type == "videolink"
    liked = Like.where(:user_id => user_id, :likeable_id => videolink_id, :likeable_type => "Videolink").first unless videolink_id.nil?
  elsif like_type == "game"
    liked = Like.where(:user_id => user_id, :likeable_id => game_id, :likeable_type => "Game").first unless game_id.nil?
  end

  if liked.present?
    liked.amount = 1
    liked.save
    return true
  else  # not voted on before...create Like record
    if like_type == "videolink"
      Like.create(:user_id => user_id, :likeable_id => videolink_id, :likeable_type => "Videolink", :amount => 1) 
    elsif like_type == "game"
      Like.create(:user_id => user_id, :likeable_id => game_id, :likeable_type => "Game", :amount => 1) 
    end
    return true
  end

  return false

end
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would do something like:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base  
  has_many :likes, :dependent => :destroy  

  def likes_the(obj)
    like = likes.find_or_initialize_by_likeable_type_and_likeable_id(obj.class.name, obj.id)
    like.amount += 1
    like.save
  end
end

User.first.likes_the(VideoLink.first)

First, I think its wrong to deal with the "params" hash on the model level. To me its a red flag when you pass the entire params hash to a model. Thats in the scope of your controllers, your models should have no knowledge of the structure of your params hash, imo.

Second, I think its always cleaner to use objects when possible instead of class methods. What you are doing deals with an object, no reason to perform this on the class level. And finding the objects should be trivial in your controllers. After all this is the purpose of the controllers. To glue everything together.

Finally, eliminate all of the "return false" and "return true" madness. The save method takes care of that. The last "return false" in your method will never be called, because the if else clause above prevents it. In my opinion you should rarely be calling "return" in ruby, since ruby always returns the last evaluated line. In only use return if its at the very top of the method to handle an exception.

Hope this helps.

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1  
+1 for find_or_create_by_... Love those helper methods. –  DanneManne Feb 8 '11 at 1:14
    
+1 for the find_or_create as well. I will try and implement that method soon. Looks nice and clean. Also, great points on the params and models. Dang. This is why I head to SO. Great education. Thanks! –  cbmeeks Feb 8 '11 at 18:25
    
I'm not at my "Rails computer" yet but would you put "find_or_initialize_by_likeable_type_and_likeable_id" instead of create because I would be setting the amount field? Doesn't initialize do a "new" where as create actually sends to the db? Thanks –  cbmeeks Feb 8 '11 at 18:57
    
By the way, Datamapper provides a generic helper method "first_or_create", maybe ActiveRecord has such a method too... –  Philip Feb 8 '11 at 20:46
    
Actually, yes, find_or_initialize_by is a better choice. I didn't even know that existed. Good point, I'll update. –  Binary Logic Feb 9 '11 at 0:42
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I'm not sure what the rest of your code looks like but you might consider this as a replacement:

def self.likesit(user_id, params)
  return false unless params[:like_type]
  query = {:user_id => user_id,
           :likeable_id => eval("params[:#{params[:like_type]}_id]"), 
           :likeable_type => params[:like_type].capitalize}
  if (liked = Like.where(query).first).present?
    liked.amount = 1
    liked.save
  else  # not voted on before...create Like record
    Like.create(query.merge({:amount => 1})) 
  end
end

I assume liked.save and Like.create return true if they are succesful, otherwise nil is returned. And what about the unless game_id.nil? ? Do you really need that? If it's nil, it's nil and saved as nil. But you might as well check in your data model for nil's. (validations or something)

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1  
+1 for offering a much cleaner version than me. However, I do think I like Binary Logic's more. But you certainly gave me something to think about. thanks –  cbmeeks Feb 8 '11 at 18:27
    
You're welcome. Yeah, I probably would also prefer Binary Logic's version. ;-) –  Philip Feb 8 '11 at 20:43
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