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How do I go about if I need to initialize an object's base with existing object? For example, in this scenario:

public class A
{
    public string field1;
    public string field2;
}

public class B : A
{
    public string field3;
    public void Assign(A source)
    {
        this.base = source; // <-- will not work, what can I do here?
    }
}

Assign() method can, obviously assign values to the base class field-by-field, but isn't there a better solution? Since class B inherits from A, there must be a way to just assign A to the B.base

In C++ this would be a trivial thing to do, but I can't seem to grasp how to do this in .NET

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10 Answers 10

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Unfortunately base is readonly.

[Edit]
Well perhaps not so unfortunate. The relationship between a base class and a child class is IS-A not HAS-A. By allowing a child class to change the instance of the base class you are allowing the child class to change its own reference since it IS-A base class. If you truly need this functionality then I would suggest you change your inheritance model to reflect what you truly want to do.

Something like this:

public class A
{
    public string field1;
    public string field2;
}

public class B
{
    public string field3;
    public A a;

    public void Assign(A source)
    {
        this.a = source;
    }
}

seems more appropriate and has clearer meaning and functionality.

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+1 this does smell of inheritance being used for composition. –  Dan Blair Jan 29 '09 at 19:17
    
I hate to say it, but it looks like this method is the only one I could use :( –  galets Jan 29 '09 at 20:11
1  
This is a way, way roundabouts way of doing it. I'd highly recommend using constructors to set these fields. If a variable is private to a class, it's that way for a reason. If you have a parent class that you want children to manipulate, make the members protected or public. –  Robert P Jan 29 '09 at 20:19
        public Assign(A a)
        {
            foreach (var prop in typeof(A).GetProperties())
            {
                this.GetType().GetProperty(prop.Name).SetValue(this, prop.GetValue(a, null),null);
            }
        }

Basically, it uses reflection to get all the properties of the base and assign the values of this, to all the values that exist in A.

EDIT: To all you naysayers out there, I quickly tested this now with a base class that had 100 integer variables. I then had this assign method in a subclass. It took 46 milliseconds to run. I don't know about you, but I'm totally fine with that.

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this may technically work, but this is ugly and would slow down the init of the object. –  Nick Berardi Jan 29 '09 at 18:47
2  
I hate when people say reflection is slow. Unless if you're dealing with performance critical code, it's really a non issue. I've done reflection that reflected over many many classes and all of their properties (over an entire DataContext class with 100 tables) and it took no time at all. –  BFree Jan 29 '09 at 18:49
    
puke! better to advise the individual to not do things like that, or use composition, than to show them how to abuse reflection... –  user7116 Jan 29 '09 at 19:56
    
I do understand that reflection is not made for that kind of access; I also understand that we were given tools and APIs in order to use them, therefore your solution seems fine. I'm not marking it as an answer, since it's not what I was asking about, but I approve of responsible use of this method –  galets Feb 10 '09 at 2:26
    
I guess that's about what MemberwiseClone does. It maybe quite usefull, but I'm not a big fan of reflection neither. –  Johnny5 Jul 18 '11 at 20:18

While there are many excellent answers here, I think the proper way to do this is by chaining the constructors:

public class A
{
    public string field1;
    public string field2;

    public A(string field1, string2 field2)
    {
         this.field1 = field1;
         this.field2 = field2;
    }
}

public class B : A
{
    public string field3;

    public B(string field1, string2 field2, string field3)
        : base(field1, field2)
    {
        this.field3 = field3;
    }
}
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No the syntax you are trying is not possible in C# .NET you need to do.

public void Assign(A source) {
    field1 = source.field1;
    field2 = source.field2; 
}
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Is the intent that these fields will be initialized once during object construction, or could "Assign" be called multiple times during an object's lifetime? If the latter, you can disregard the rest of this :)

Andrew's distinction between IS-A and HAS-A is an important one; if the relationship really is a HAS-A, his composition solution is the way to go.

If an IS-A relationship makes more sense (and you are able to modify A), a copy constructor might be a good idea:

public class A
{
    public string field1;
    public string field2;

    public A(A copyFrom)
    {
        this.field1 = copyFrom.field1;
        this.field2 = copyFrom.field2;
    }
}

public class B : A
{
    public string field3;

    public B(A source)
        : base(source)
    {
    }
}

You end up having to copy each of A's properties, but the responsibility for doing so resides in A where it belongs.

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Why would you need to? By declaring a new B, the CLR automatically calls the constructors for both classes.

B myB = new B();

B new has the fields of both classes. However, you should declare them with an initializer unless you like nulls:

public string field1 = "";
public string field2 = string.Empty;
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I hope I'm not the only one who thinks swapping out your base class is a bad design pattern. Another approach is to replace inheritance with composition:

public class A
{
    public string Field1 { get; set; }
    public string Field2 { get; set; }
}

public class B
{
    public A A { get; set; }
    public string Field3 { get; set; }

    public B(A a) { this.A = a; }
}

Now its trivial to write something like this:

B b = new B ( new A { Field1 = "hello", Field2 = "world" } );

b.A = new A { Field1 = "hola", Field2 = "luna" };
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think OO is a bad design pattern, and you example makes OO totally useless. –  Nick Berardi Jan 29 '09 at 19:22
1  
@Nick: there are plenty of occasions when composition solves problems that inheritance can't. The classic textbook example is when you need to hotswap implementation in one class with another, which is exactly what the author wants to do. (continued...) –  Juliet Jan 29 '09 at 19:48
1  
(from previous) Since the base class is a reference to the object instance, and not just a fancy container, its not possible to swap one base for another. Therefore, the only reasonable solution to the authors problem is to wrap the "base" in a property. Why do you think my approach is wrong? –  Juliet Jan 29 '09 at 19:52

Wrong question. You're obviously abusing inheritance here. Try to refactor it, so that you keep a reference to A as a member field. If you need polymorphism, consider having common base class or better yet - an interface.

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According to MSDN, "base" can inly be used for the following operations:

  • Call a method on the base class that has been overridden by another method.
  • Specify which base-class constructor should be called when creating instances of the derived class.
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    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod()
    {
        A a = new A();
        a.field1 = "test";
        string xml = Serialize(a);
        xml = xml.Replace("A", "B");
        B b = Deserialize(xml);

        Assert.AreEqual("test", b.field1);
    }

    public string Serialize(A a)
    {
        System.IO.StreamReader streamReader = null;
        System.IO.MemoryStream memoryStream = null;
        try
        {
            memoryStream = new System.IO.MemoryStream();
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(A));
            serializer.Serialize(memoryStream, a);
            memoryStream.Seek(0, System.IO.SeekOrigin.Begin);
            streamReader = new System.IO.StreamReader(memoryStream);
            return streamReader.ReadToEnd();
        }
        finally
        {
            if ((streamReader != null))
            {
                streamReader.Dispose();
            }
            if ((memoryStream != null))
            {
                memoryStream.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }

    public static B Deserialize(string xml)
    {
        System.IO.StringReader stringReader = null;
        try
        {
            stringReader = new System.IO.StringReader(xml);
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(B));
            return ((B)(serializer.Deserialize(System.Xml.XmlReader.Create(stringReader))));
        }
        finally
        {
            if ((stringReader != null))
            {
                stringReader.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }
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