Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently, I came across a volatile flag technique, which I may avoid from using synchronized or lock.

http://jeremymanson.blogspot.com/2008/11/what-volatile-means-in-java.html

Here is one of the code example of using volatile flag.

Correct Working Example

Thread 1
========
// re-odering will not happen. initialize_var...
// will not move below "volatile_initialization_ready = true"
// statement.
initialize_var1();
initialize_var2();
initialize_var3();
volatile_initialization_ready = true;


Thread 2
========
if (volatile_initialization_ready) {
    use_var1();
    use_var2();
    use_var3();
}

However, I find out I just can't use this technique in certain situation as follow.

Wrong Working Example

Thread 1
========
volatile_going_to_destroy = true;
destroy_var1();
destroy_var2();
destroy_var3();

Thread 2
========
if (volatile_going_to_destroy) {
    return;    // ignore.
}

// But Thread 1 still able to perform destroy
// when Thread 2 halt right here. Also, re-ordering might
// happen, where destroy_var1 might move above 
// "volatile_going_to_destroy = true" statement.
use_var1();
use_var2();
use_var3();

I was wondering, is it possible for me to make Wrong Working Example work, but just using volatile, without using synchronized or lock?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

volatile only solves the visibility problem. You still need locks for synchronization.

share|improve this answer

You can use an algorithm like the following http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dekker%27s_algorithm. It allows for safe variable access with only memory barriers but without locks.

share|improve this answer
    
The java.util.concurrent.atomic package provides classes that support lock-free thread-safe programming on single variables –  Pangea Feb 8 '11 at 2:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.