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This is the regular for-loop:

for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) { ... }

It is used to iterate over arrays, but also to just repeat some process n times.

I use the above mentioned form, but it repulses me. The header var i = 0; i < n; i++ is plain ugly and has to be rewritten literally every time it is used.

I am writing this question because I came up with an alternative:

repeat(n, function(i) { ... });

Here we use the repeat function which takes two arguments:
1. the number of iterations,
2. a function which body represents the process that is being repeated.

The "code-behind" would be like so:

function repeat(n, f) {
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        f(i);
    }
} 

(I am aware of the performance implications of having two additional "levels" in the scope chain of the process)

BTW, for those of you who use the jQuery library, the above mentioned functionality can be achieved out-of-the-box via the $.each method like so:

$.each(Array(n), function(i) { ... });  

So what do you think? Is this repeat function a valid alternative to the native for loop? What are the down-sides of this alternative (other than performance - I know about that)?

Native:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    // do stuff
}

Alternative:

repeat(10, function(i) {
    // do stuff
});
share|improve this question
2  
whatever floats your boat man...maybe it's because I've been coding for like 25 years but IMO the for(..) syntax as-is works just fine for me (and the syntax is pretty much the same for many other languages' for loops) – Crayon Violent Feb 8 '11 at 2:49
    
One nice advantage is that the i variable doesn't clutter up your scope. Apart from that I'd have to say Meh. :) – deceze Feb 8 '11 at 2:50

You say you want a revolution... Well, you know: ruby did it just before (?)

Number.prototype.times = function(func) { 
    for(var i = 0; i < Number(this); i++) {
        func(i); 
    }
}

means

(50).times(function(i) {
    console.log(i)
})

Anyway, don't fight against C, you'll always lose :-P

share|improve this answer
    
Haha, how cute. – Šime Vidas Feb 8 '11 at 3:03

it's an interesting thought, but if you dislike the syntax for the loop, you could always do a different type of loop:

var i = arr.length; 
while (i--) {
    // do stuff
}

the reverse while loop is generally faster than a for loop as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, this reverse while loop definitively looks better. :) – Šime Vidas Feb 8 '11 at 3:09
    
.. especially if it's written in one line: var i = n; while (i--) {. I might start using this ... – Šime Vidas Feb 8 '11 at 3:21
    
That's pretty neat. Might take a second for another coder to understand when they first see it, but seems pretty elegant. – crclayton May 15 '15 at 16:52

To address the issue of not having the break statement as others have mentioned, I would solve it this way:

function repeat(n, f) {
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        if (f(i) === false) return;
    }
}

Then returning false from within a loop handler will be equivalent to break.

Another disadvantage is that the context changes. You may want to add the option of proxying a context into the loop handlers:

function repeat(context, n, f) {
    if (!f) f = n, f = context, context = window;

    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        if (f.call(context, i) === false) return;
    }
}

Now, an advantage is that the index is preserved by the function scope, to avoid a common bug:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    setTimeout(function () {
        alert(i); // Will alert "10" every time
    }, 1000);
}

repeat(10, function (i) {
    setTimeout(function() {
        alert(i); // Will alert "0", "1", "2", ...
    }, 1000);
});
share|improve this answer
    
you could save up some bytes there if(f(i)===false)return; – JCOC611 Feb 8 '11 at 2:57
    
@JCO good point :) – Box9 Feb 8 '11 at 2:59
    
sometimes it's a feature, not a bug. Suppose you want to find a value, or add it at the bottom if it doesn't show up. – Gonzalo Larralde Feb 8 '11 at 3:00
    
Oh, also, as somebody mentioned below: return doesn't work properly, but I think, using this code, you could pretty much return whatever the call returns, or break if it's false. – JCOC611 Feb 8 '11 at 3:01
    
Great answer +1 :) – Šime Vidas Feb 8 '11 at 3:14

It seems pretty valid. I honestly don't think that performance would decrease too much. But there is however one big downside, that is easily fixable: the break statement.

function repeat(n, f) {
   for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
      var tcall=i;
      tcall.die=function(){i=n}
      f.call(tcall);
   }
}  

This way you would be able to call this.die() instead of break; which I think would throw an error.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the .die idea, although pass it in as a separate argument. You'll find that the die property is immediately lost after assigning it to a primitive. – Box9 Feb 8 '11 at 3:09

Besides what you have already stated the main downside I see is that a "return" statement will work differently. (Which is often why I end up using "for" over "$.each" many times in my own ventures.)

share|improve this answer
    
Yea, that's a good point. – Šime Vidas Feb 8 '11 at 3:04

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