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I'm trying to Maxima-fy my Mathematica box options formula (https://github.com/barrycarter/bcapps/blob/master/box-option-value.m) but Maxima crashes on a fairly simple integration:

load(distrib); 
pdflp(x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) := pdf_normal(x,log(p0),sqrt(t1)*v); 
cdfmaxlp(x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) := 1-erf(x/(v*sqrt(t2-t1)/sqrt(2))); 

upandin(p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) :=  
 integrate( 
 float( 
 pdflp(x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2)* 
 cdfmaxlp(log(p1)-x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) 
 ), 
 x, minf, log(p1)); 

Evaluating upandin w/ certain values crashes:

upandin(1, .15, 1.01, 1.02, 1/365.2425, 2/365.2425); 

rat: replaced -.00995033085316809 by -603/60601 = -.00995033085262619 

rat: replaced 2.718281828459045 by 23225/8544 = 2.718281835205993 

rat: replaced 8116.5 by 16233/2 = 8116.5 

rat: replaced 2.718281828459045 by 23225/8544 = 2.718281835205993 

rat: replaced -8116.5 by -16233/2 = -8116.5 

rat: replaced 1.0 by 1/1 = 1.0 

rat: replaced 1.792882852833688 by 4484/2501 = 1.792882846861255 

rat: replaced 180.1832400641081 by 126849/704 = 180.1832386363636 

rat: replaced 2.718281828459045 by 23225/8544 = 2.718281835205993 

rat: replaced -8116.5 by -16233/2 = -8116.5 

rat: replaced -1.0 by -1/1 = -1.0 

rat: replaced 1.792882852833688 by 4484/2501 = 1.792882846861255 

rat: replaced 180.1832400641081 by 126849/704 = 180.1832386363636 

rat: replaced 2.718281828459045 by 23225/8544 = 2.718281835205993 

rat: replaced -8116.5 by -16233/2 = -8116.5 

rat: replaced 1.0 by 1/1 = 1.0 

rat: replaced -1.0 by -1/1 = -1.0 
Maxima encountered a Lisp error: 

 The value 16090668801 is not of type FIXNUM. 

Without the float() in upandin, Maxima just leaves the integral in original form.

Can someone help? I thought converting Mathematica to Maxima would be easy, but now I'm not as sure.

The Mathematica version works fine:

pdflp[x_, p0_, v_, p1_, p2_, t1_, t2_] :=  
 PDF[NormalDistribution[Log[p0],Sqrt[t1]*v]][x] 

cdfmaxlp[x_, p0_, v_, p1_, p2_, t1_, t2_] := 1-Erf[x/(v*Sqrt[t2-t1]/Sqrt[2])]; 

(* NIntegrate below "equivalent" to Maximas float(); no closed form *) 

upandin[p0_, v_, p1_, p2_, t1_, t2_] :=  
 NIntegrate[pdflp[x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2]* 
           cdfmaxlp[Log[p1]-x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2], 
{x, -Infinity, Log[p1]}] 

upandin[1, .15, 1.01, 1.02, 1/365.2425, 2/365.2425] 

0.0998337 

EDIT: Is there any open source Mathematica-like program that WILL numerically approximate this function? I'd really like to release open source code to an open source platform.

share|improve this question
    
On my machine, when I evaluate that it says ` Too large to be represented as a DOUBLE-FLOAT:` and then gives a 9774-digit integer. I am not actually familiar with Maxima, but perhaps you could convert everything to floats at an earlier stage? –  acl Feb 8 '11 at 15:30
    
The weird thing is the "rat:" messages which imply floats are being converted back to rationals, which probably makes things worse. And Maxima doesn't have arbitrary precision numbers?! –  barrycarter Feb 8 '11 at 18:45
    
Maybe you can post the question over at ask.sagemath.org since a lot of the calculus in sage still uses Maxima. –  Simon Feb 10 '11 at 3:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I know Maxima tries very hard to avoid floats, and I think that's what it's trying to do here, but I'm not enough of a Maxima guru to explain how to prevent it. Pretty much anything numerical can handle this, although you might have to break the interval or transform the integrand manually. Note that you say it's fairly simple, but it's awfully steep: for these parameters, the integrand is ~6*10^(-34) at 0.1 and ~3*10^(-206) at -0.1. That's enough of a range to give lots of naive integration algorithms fits.

Anyway, you can do it easily enough in Sage using tools from scipy and gsl behind the scenes:

import scipy.stats

def pdflp(x,p0,v,t1):
    return scipy.stats.norm(log(p0), sqrt(t1)*v).pdf(x)

def cdfmaxlp(x,v,t1,t2):
    return (1-erf(x/(v*sqrt(t2-t1)/sqrt(2.))))

def upandin(p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2):
    integrand = lambda x: (pdflp(x,p0,v,t1) * cdfmaxlp(log(p1)-x,v,t1,t2))
    return numerical_integral(integrand, -Infinity, log(p1))

sage: upandin(1, .15, 1.01, 1.02, 1/365.2425, 2/365.2425)
(0.099833725578983457, 7.5174412058308382e-07)

or use mpmath's quad if you need arbitrary precision. [I had a guess at the "correct" value here, but since we don't have that much precision to start with, it's kind of silly.]

share|improve this answer

(I probably have no business answering this, but...)

Just a guess, but it seems that integrate wants to make the input exact again, and maybe is doing some difficult bignum computations involving rational arithmetic. It rationalize your approximate e (Euler number) so that means it could behave differently from integrate(0 with exact input.

Might want to check

http://eagle.cs.kent.edu/MAXIMA/maxima_21.html

or

http://www.delorie.com/gnu/docs/maxima/maxima_62.html

for dedicated numerical code e.g from Quadpack.

(Still wondering why I'm even trying to answer this. There must be Maxima expertise somewhere on Stack Overflow.)

Daniel Lichtblau Wolfram Research

share|improve this answer
    
And you even signed your company's name? Sheesh! The correct answer would've been "see, that's why you need to buy Mathematica instead of piddling around w/ this crappy 'open source' stuff". –  barrycarter Feb 9 '11 at 23:41
3  
@Timo I have no quarrel with Maxima, either the program or implementors. Moreover one who I think leads that work, Robert Dodier, has on occasion asked or answered questions posted on MathGroup. Always friendly and respectful, so I have incentive not to annoy him. Only wish he were answering your question. All that stated, you are correct that I'm perhaps foolish to sign my company's name. Should have added I'm not a spokesperson... –  Daniel Lichtblau Feb 9 '11 at 23:56
    
@Barry Apologies, I meant you and not Timo (was still thinking about an earlier response, differet question). –  Daniel Lichtblau Feb 10 '11 at 16:28
    
Your effort in answering the question should be more respected. Keep moving! –  belisarius Feb 10 '11 at 22:16

Use quad_qagi to numerically approximate an integral over an infinite interval. ?? quad_ shows info about Quadpack functions.

load (distrib);
pdflp (x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) := pdf_normal (x, log(p0), sqrt(t1)*v); 
cdfmaxlp (x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) := 1 - erf(x/(v * sqrt(t2 - t1)/sqrt(2))); 

upandin (p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) := block ([integrand],
   integrand : pdflp (x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) * cdfmaxlp (log(p1) - x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2),
   quad_qagi (integrand, x, minf, log(p1))); 

upandin (1, .15, 1.01, 1.02, 1/365.2425, 2/365.2425);
 => [.09983372557898755, 2.839204848435967E-10, 225, 0]

Sorry for the late reply. Leaving this here in case someone finds it by searching.

share|improve this answer

Maxima's 'integrate' function does symbolic, not numeric, integration. When it returns a noun form from an integral, that means it can't perform the (symbolic) integration. Changing the parameters of the expression from exact to floating (using 'float') won't change that.

I think what you're looking for is a numeric integration routine -- Maxima offers a variety of those, from the very basic romberg to a variety of Quadpack methods (try ?? quad for documentation).

    -s

PS As for "this crappy 'open source' stuff" -- what brought that on? You might want to look at the history of Macsyma/Maxima in the Wikipedia article for some perspective.

share|improve this answer
    
I am fairly sure the "crappy 'open source' stuff" was merely a mockery of what might be expected from a corporate representative, and by contrast a commendation of Daniel's approach. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 1 '11 at 21:45

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