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I added a "spoiler" class in CSS to use for, well, spoilers. Text is normally invisible but appears when the mouse hovers over it to reveal the spoiler to whoever wants to read it.

.spoiler{
    visibility:hidden;

}
.spoiler:hover {
    visibility:visible;
}

Should be simple, but for some reason this doesn't work. The text remains invisible even when I point the mouse on it. Any idea what could be causing this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You cannot hover over a hidden element. One solution is to nest the element inside another container:

CSS:

.spoiler span {
    visibility: hidden;
}

.spoiler:hover span {
    visibility: visible;
}

HTML:

Spoiler: <span class="spoiler"><span>E.T. phones home.</span></span>

Demo:

http://jsfiddle.net/DBXuv/

Update

On Chrome, the following can be added:

.spoiler {
    outline: 1px solid transparent;
}

Updated demo: http://jsfiddle.net/DBXuv/148/

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+1 Nice little CSS trick –  JCOC611 Feb 8 '11 at 3:46
    
Nice, but older browsers won't handle span:hover... –  Yzmir Ramirez Feb 8 '11 at 3:51
    
@Yzmir Ramirez: This was just a demonstration of the concept. Based on the target browsers, a more suitable container such as a dummy <a> can be picked. –  Ates Goral Feb 8 '11 at 4:01
1  
Doesn't work on Chrome 23. –  tostinni Dec 11 '12 at 5:40
1  
@tostinni - nasty chrome bug, by the looks of it: you can avoid it by adding .spoiler {outline:1px solid transparent;} or pretty much anything that would make the element "render" even if all rendered pixels happen to be transparent. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 27 '13 at 9:04

That's an old question, but still it may help other googlers like myself.

How about:

.spoiler {
    font-size:0;

}
.spoiler:hover {
    font-size:20px;
}
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.spoiler {
    opacity:0;
}
.spoiler:hover {
    opacity:1;
    -webkit-transition: opacity .25s ease-in-out .0s;
    transition: opacity .25s ease-in-out .0s;
}
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When the text is invisible, it practically does not occupy space, so it's practically imposible to trigger an hover event.

You should try another approach, for example, changing the font color:

.spoiler{
    color:white;

}
.spoiler:hover {
    color:black;
}
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The visibility property does take up space, it's the display property that does not. –  Brent Friar Feb 8 '11 at 3:48
    
Isn't this the way phpBB implement their [spoiler] tags? –  Yzmir Ramirez Feb 8 '11 at 3:49

:hover pseudo class is only for a tags according to the CSS spec. User agents are not required to support :hover for non-anchor tags according to the spec.

If you want to use CSS to make visible your spoiler text you will need to place <a> tags around your spoiler content. This of course will mean that the mouse would turn into a pointer, but you can suppress this by adding cursor: none;.

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1  
You can always nest the element inside a dummy <a href="#"> then... –  Ates Goral Feb 8 '11 at 3:45
    
I just saw your comment to my answer. And yeah @Ates Goral is correct. This is actually how many CSS menus work by the way. –  Yzmir Ramirez Feb 8 '11 at 3:47
1  
:hover is valid for all elements. According to the spec you linked, some User agents might not handle it, but it makes no mention of specific elements :hover does or doesn't work with. –  Eleo Nov 11 '11 at 22:43
    
What the spec incidentally means is probably things like touch-screens, where the concept of hover is dubious at best. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 27 '13 at 9:05

Try

.spoiler{
    display:none;

}
.spoiler:hover {
    display:block;
}
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3  
This would be similar to the problem in the initial question (in that you can't hover over the spoiler block), except marginally worse, in that a display:none element doesn't occupy any space in box model at all, so definitely could never be hovered over. –  Andrzej Doyle Feb 8 '11 at 13:22

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