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In MVC3, how do you create alternating row colors on a @foreach list when using the Razor view engine?

@foreach (var item in Model) {    
    <tr>
        <td>@item.DisplayName</td>
        <td>@item.Currency</td>
        <td>@String.Format("{0:dd/MM/yyyy}", item.CreatedOn)</td>
        <td>@String.Format("{0:g}", item.CreatedBy)</td>
        <td>@Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit", new { id = item.Id })</td>
    </tr>
}
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2  
One year on, and with so many views I had to change the accepted answer. CSS is the correct way to do this, not code. –  JK. Jan 3 '12 at 12:07
6  
@trebormf's answer is dependent on JavaScript. The most upvoted answer (@Kirk Woll) will accomplish the same thing but without a dependency on JavaScript. This will make it compatible with more clients, lighter weight and faster rendering - IMHO "more correct". The originally selected answer DOES use CSS. It was inline CSS, but CSS none-the-less. You could change it to set a class name or something instead of inline CSS. –  BenSwayne Apr 23 '12 at 3:46
2  
CSS is the right way to apply the styles. However rendering a table and then changing it in the DOM using JQuery is still code: just not your code. I suspect if you do performance timings on page generation you'll find the server-based approach is faster, and not reliant on JS –  Quango Mar 9 '13 at 16:22

11 Answers 11

up vote 37 down vote accepted

This is what CSS is for (changing style rather than content). Save the server the effort: Do it on the client.

Since you're using Razor, you can use JQuery. Here's how I do it in my projects:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $("table > tbody tr:odd").css("background-color", "#F7F7F7");
}
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2  
+1 This is actually the correct way to go. I use it for any alternating item table now. Except that I use .addClass() instead of .css(). Changed accepted answer to this one. –  JK. Jan 3 '12 at 12:06
    
Thanks, JK. I took took a chance answering your question 3 months later even though you had already accepted an answer. I appreciate it. –  trebormf Jan 4 '12 at 20:57
13  
"Since you're using Razor, you can use jQuery." - What does that even mean? They're independent of each other. –  David East Jun 20 '12 at 17:38
2  
It was not the best choice of words on my part. The MVC3/Razor project templates include jQuery. You're right, they are not inextricably linked. –  trebormf Aug 3 '12 at 17:04

Assuming you would rather not use CSS (i.e. :nth-child(odd)) you can either:

  • use a normal for loop:

    @for (int i = 0; i < Model.Count; i++)
    {
        ...
    }
    
  • use .Select:

    @foreach (var item in Model.Select((x, i) => new { Data = x, Index = i }))
    {
        ...
    }
    

Either way, you'd have access to the current index and could then use i % 2 == 1 as the condition for your background-color. Something like:

<tr style="background-color:@(i % 2 == 1 ? "red" : "white")">...</tr>
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not very well formatted! But it worked so thanks :) –  JK. Feb 8 '11 at 6:53
    
Nearly one year after accepting, I've changed my mind - its not correct to do a pure UI styling task in code. CSS is the correct way to go and accepted trebormf's answer instead –  JK. Jan 3 '12 at 12:05
18  
@JK., out of curiosity, did you ignore the first sentence in my answer? –  Kirk Woll Jan 3 '12 at 20:10

You could always do it in pure css using:

TABLE.test tr:nth-child(even)
{
    background-color: #EFEFEF;
}
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this is the more elegant solution, imho. Thanks! –  Vinzz Mar 9 '12 at 13:44
    
Yes, I second that. For me, this is the best solution. Thanks. –  sammydc Feb 21 '13 at 1:59
    
+1, elegant syntax. However, you should always mention browser support when doing anything fancy with css. In this case, no support in IE prior to version 9. –  Patrick M Sep 30 '13 at 22:01

With ASP.NET MVC 3 and the new @helper syntax, there is a neater way to handle this.

First add this @helper method:

@helper AlternateBackground(string color) {
    if (ViewBag.count == null) { ViewBag.count = 0; }
    <text>style="background-color:@(ViewBag.count % 2 == 1 ? color : "none")"</text>
    ViewBag.count++;
}

Then just add the call to the helper in your <TR> element

@foreach (var item in Model) {    
    <tr @AlternateBackground("Red")>
        <td>@item.DisplayName</td>
        <td>@item.Currency</td>
        <td>@String.Format("{0:dd/MM/yyyy}", item.CreatedOn)</td>
        <td>@String.Format("{0:g}", item.CreatedBy)</td>
        <td>@Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit", new { id = item.Id })</td>
    </tr>
}
share|improve this answer
    
nicely done! Little formatting error it should be <tr @AlternateBackground("Red")>. It won't work right without the '@' –  Rondel Nov 16 '11 at 22:20
    
This helped me out tremendously dealing with HTML e-mails. As you may know CSS <style> tags are stripped by some e-mail (em, GMail), and CSS is mangled in other e-mail (em, Outlook). I set up nice zebra striping with CSS' nth thingy, but was smacked hard by the HTML e-mail beast. Using MVC3 this helped tremendously to putting the striping back in my long tables. YAY! Just have to add the @ to every <tr> (BOO?). –  REMESQ Aug 3 '12 at 21:46

How about something like this?

@for (int i = 0; i < Model.length; i++) {
  <tr @(i % 2 != 0 ? class="odd" : "")>
    <td>@Model[i].DisplayName</td>
    <td>@Model[i].Currency</td>
    <td>@String.Format("{0:dd/MM/yyyy}", Model[i].CreatedOn)</td>
    <td>@String.Format("{0:g}", Model[i].CreatedBy)</td>
    <td>@Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit", new { id = Model[i].Id })</td>
  </tr>
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it's IEnumerable, so @for didn't work, and there was something wrong with <tr @(i % 2 != 0 ? class="odd" : "")> too –  JK. Feb 8 '11 at 6:53
    
line 2 might be better as <tr class="@(i%2 != 0 ? "odd" : null)" > –  Quango Mar 9 '13 at 16:20
    
@Quango: Yes, in the version of Razor that ships with MVC4+, that's a better way to do it (that leaves class="" (or would it be class=null?) in MVC3's Razor engine though, which is kind of sloppy). –  Dave Ward Mar 9 '13 at 18:19
@{  
    int i = 0;
    foreach (Account acct in Model)
    {
        <div class="row @(i%2==0?"even":"odd")">     
            <a href="/Account/Details/@acct.id">@acct.name</a>
        </div>
        i++;
    }
}
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Original: http://15daysofjquery.com/table-striping-made-easy/5/ Author: Jack Born jQuery Zebra_Striping_Made_Easy

=============== Java script ===================

$(document).ready(function () {
          $('.stripeMe tr:even').addClass('alt');

          $('.stripeMe tr').hover(
            function () {
                $(this).addClass("highlight");
              },
             function () {
                $(this).removeClass("highlight");
              });
      });

================= css =================

tr.alt td {
background-color : #F7F7F7;
}
tr.highlight td {
background-color : #bcd4ec;
}

=============== HTML ===============

<table class="stripeMe">
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I Like this to dynamically attach a class value –  Diin Feb 10 '13 at 16:48

There isn't much documentation on it, but the Loop Helper (http://nuget.org/Packages/Packages/Details/Loop-Helper-for-WebMatrix-0-1) gives you support for detecting Even/Odd/etc. items.

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Thanks I will try that too - @anurse since you would have to be the most authoritative source for razor answers :) –  JK. Feb 8 '11 at 22:23

what about using the jQuery DataTable plugin. i used it on an MVC2 application i developed.

http://www.datatables.net/

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A solution i use to support IE8 (corporate browser, not by choice) was to combine the_lotus's solution with a jquery solution

Since IE8 doesnt support nth-child() use this css

.tableclass tr.even{
    background:#E6EDF5;
}

And use jQuery to do this:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".table tr:nth-child(even)").addClass("even");
});
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You could let the framework decide how best to render it, presumably using a bit of browser detection logic and whatever other goodness it has built-in, something like the following, and get on with your life.

:-)

My point being that with this approach the WebGrid will control the alternating grid colors using the best technology it can (best that it is designed to use, at least) for the detected browser. It might not use "nth" CSS syntax, but that might not work for all of your intended audience, anyway, so you'd have to detect the browser and emit different content on your own. Of course everybody should be using a CSS 3.x-compliant browser by now, but mileage varies.

@myWebGrid.GetHtml
    (
    tableStyle: "some-style",
    headerStyle: "some-head-style",
    alternatingRowStyle: "some-fancy-alt-row-style",
    etc ...
    )

The System.Web.Helpers.WebGrid's GetHtml method signature looks like this here:

public IHtmlString GetHtml
    (
    string tableStyle = null,
    string headerStyle = null,
    string footerStyle = null,
    string rowStyle = null,
    string alternatingRowStyle = null,
    string selectedRowStyle = null,
    string caption = null,
    bool displayHeader = true,
    bool fillEmptyRows = false,
    string emptyRowCellValue = null,
    IEnumerable<WebGridColumn> columns = null,
    IEnumerable<string> exclusions = null,
    WebGridPagerModes mode = WebGridPagerModes.Numeric | WebGridPagerModes.NextPrevious,
    string firstText = null,
    string previousText = null,
    string nextText = null,
    string lastText = null,
    int numericLinksCount = 5,
    object htmlAttributes = null
    );
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