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I am attempting to write a function which compares two lists to see if they represent the same set. That is '(a b c d d) and '(d c b a d) represent the same set. The elements can be in any order.

This is what I have, which works:

(defun samesetp (list1 list2)
  (cond
    ((null list1) (null list2))
    ((eq list2 (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1)) nil)
    (t (samesetP (cdr list1) (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1))))))

The reason I do not like this is that (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1)) is being computed twice - once to test if the remove operation truly removed anything, and once to recursively test the rest of the list(s) sans that element.

Can anyone suggest a way to improve this without using a different algorithm?

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1  
You should use hashtables, this will bring down the complexity from O(n^2) to O(n). –  leppie Feb 8 '11 at 7:19
1  
I am confused. You're using a horrible algorithm, and want improvements as long as they don't involve fixing the bad algorithm. Why? As @leppie said, use hash tables. Or else sort both lists, and walk them in parallel. The better algorithm will make much more of a difference than the micro-optimization you are concerned with. –  btilly Feb 8 '11 at 7:30
    
Chill out guys, we aren't allowed to use hash tables. It's part of a homework problem. If you can think of a more efficient algorithm that can be contained within about 10 lines of code, please enlighten me. –  Adam S Feb 8 '11 at 9:09
2  
Don't use trailing parentheses on their own line. Lisp is not C or Java. –  Rainer Joswig Feb 8 '11 at 9:29
1  
In support of Rainer's comment - see mumble.net/~campbell/scheme/style.txt –  Shaun Feb 8 '11 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
(defun samesetp (list1 list2)
    (cond
        ((null list1) (null list2))
        ((eq list2 (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1)) nil)
        (t (samesetP (cdr list1) (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1))))
    )
)

First let's format it correctly:

(defun samesetp (list1 list2)
  (cond ((null list1) (null list2))
        ((eq list2 (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1)) nil)
        (t (samesetP (cdr list1) (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1)))))

If you use a form twice and you want to change that, then you need to store a value. LET is the construct for that. If it doesn't fit into one COND, then you need a second one.

(defun samesetp (list1 list2)
  (cond ((null list1) (null list2))
        (t (let ((list3 (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1)))
             (cond ((eq list2 list3) nil)
                   (t (samesetP (cdr list1) list3)))))))

Now, EQ can't be used to compare lists. Use EQUAL.

(defun samesetp (list1 list2)
  (cond ((null list1) (null list2))
        (t (let ((list3 (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1)))
             (cond ((equal list2 list3) nil)
                   (t (samesetP (cdr list1) list3)))))))

COND is overkill here, use IF:

(defun samesetp (list1 list2)
  (if (null list1)
      (null list2)
    (let ((list3 (remove (car list1) list2 :count 1)))
      (if (equal list2 list3)
          nil
        (samesetP (cdr list1) list3)))))

Now, you only need to make the function do what was asked in the homework. But it is your homework anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I see LET is what might really help here. –  Adam S Feb 8 '11 at 9:56
1  
You should mark Rainer's answer as accepted if this is what helped you. I'll add that it's a good answer at that, so +1. –  Shaun Feb 8 '11 at 14:51
1  
Yes, I did mark it. Thanks Rainer I really do appreciate the help! –  Adam S Feb 8 '11 at 17:19

I guess you are not allowed to use built-in functions for solving the problem, but just to note there is one:

(set-difference list1 list2)
share|improve this answer
1  
ITYM set-exclusive-or. For set-difference, the order of arguments matters. –  Rörd Dec 27 '11 at 13:45

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