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Given a Collection of Strings, how would you join them in plain Java, without using an external Library?

Given these variables:

Collection<String> data = Arrays.asList("Snap", "Crackle", "Pop");
String separator = ", ";
String joined; // let's create this, shall we?

This is how I'd do it in Guava:

joined = Joiner.on(separator).join(data);

And in Apache Commons / Lang:

joined = StringUtils.join(data, separator);

But in plain Java, is there really no better way than this?

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for(String item : data){
    if(sb.length()>0)sb.append(separator);
    sb.append(item);
}
joined = sb.toString();
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@Sébastien none of these questions has an answer that's shorter than mine and not using an external library –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 8 '11 at 8:34
    
the accepted answer on stackoverflow.com/questions/1751844/… does answer your question: no, there's no nicer way to do it except for third-party libraries. –  Joachim Sauer Feb 8 '11 at 8:50
3  
The fact there's no simple clean way to do it explains why it has to be added to all these libraries. –  Kevin Bourrillion Feb 8 '11 at 15:00
    
@Kevin as you of all people would know :-) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 8 '11 at 15:25
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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I'd say the best way of doing this (if by best you don't mean "most concise") without using Guava is using the technique Guava uses internally, which for your example would look something like this:

Iterator<String> iter = data.iterator();
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
if (iter.hasNext()) {
  sb.append(iter.next());
  while (iter.hasNext()) {
    sb.append(separator).append(iter.next());
  }
}
String joined = sb.toString();

This doesn't have to do a boolean check while iterating and doesn't have to do any postprocessing of the string.

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Very elegant, thanks. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 11 '11 at 21:38
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May be instead of calling sb.length() again and again in a loop, i have slightly modified.

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
String separator = "";
for(String item : data){
    sb.append(separator);
    separator=",";
    sb.append(item);
}
joined = sb.toString();
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1  
That's original, thanks (+1) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 8 '11 at 8:47
1  
Why the edit? The old String based version was more flexible and the new version adds an unnecessary space to the beginning. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 8 '11 at 12:25
1  
sorry too much premature optimization :) –  Dead Programmer Feb 8 '11 at 12:41
    
This is how I do it, too. It avoids an extra if in favour of an extra non-conditional statement, which makes it preferable in the framework of Bob Martin's "Transformation Priority Premise" (blog.8thlight.com/uncle-bob/2013/05/27/…). It is also probably faster to execute (branches have a performance penalty in the processor whereas repeated assignment is likely to have very little cost; it is also probably easier for a loop unroller to optimize away the extra statements in this form). –  Jules Nov 14 '13 at 6:50
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In Java 8:

String.join (separator, data)
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Java 8+

joined =String.join(separator, data);

Java 7 and below

No, that's the best way to my knowledge.

When I'm lazy, and the separator is the ", " that you suggested, I tend do the following though:

joined = data.toString().substring(1);
joined = joined.substring(0, joined.length()-1);

Here is another trick that avoids calling length():

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
boolean first = true;
for(String item : data){
    if(!first || (first = false)) sb.append(separator);
    sb.append(item);
}
joined = sb.toString();
share|improve this answer
    
I don't like using if(first) because it's unnecessarily verbose, but I have to agree that if(!first || (first = false)) is nifty (+1) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 8 '11 at 12:22
    
I was going to give the Checkmark to @Suresh S, but I don't like the current edit, so here goes –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 8 '11 at 12:26
    
Instead of your first example, you could just do: joined = data.toString().substring(1, joined.length() - 2); –  Dan King Mar 14 at 16:33
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Yes, this is the best and the fastest way to do it in plain Java.

See this paper for more info:

http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/java/strings.html

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Different intentions:

For third-part tools, such as Guava's Joiner, which is not fast, but very flexible. There are many option methods to customize join behavior, such as skipNulls().

Plain Java is fast, but it needs you write some lines of codes by yourself.

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4  
I'd say Joiner is plenty fast, especially if you reuse a pre-built Joiner for a specific separator. It uses a StringBuilder for the building and it has a really interesting way of ensuring that it only adds a separator at the right places that doesn't require any boolean check each iteration. –  ColinD Feb 11 '11 at 21:14
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Your proposition is a possible solution, another common one is:

for (String item: data) {
    sb.append(item)
    sb.append(separator);
}
String joined = sb.substring(0, sb.length() - separator.length())
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More like: sb.substring(0, sb.length() - separator.length()). But I'd call this an awful hack –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 8 '11 at 8:38
2  
It is. In fact you have to choose between an hack, a often useless test and the use of an iterator to extract the first member of the list. No perfect solution. –  Nicolas Feb 8 '11 at 8:43
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