Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to explore a graph here but I am not sure what is wrong with the explore function. The recursion doesn't seem to be working correctly; while exploring the neighbours of the node 0 it explored 0, 1, 2 and then never returns back to explore 3, 4, 5; why is that so?

explored=[]
//class definition 
function graph(){
    this.graph=new Array();
    this .graph[0] = [1,0,1,1,0,1]
    this .graph[1] = [0,1,1,1,0,0]
    this .graph[2] = [1,1,1,1,0,0]
    this .graph[3] = [1,1,1,1,1,0]
    this .graph[4] = [0,0,0,1,1,0]
    this .graph[5] = [1,0,0,0,0,0]

    this.explore    = explore

}

function explore(node,depth){

    explored[node]=1
    document.write('<br>')
    for(x=0;x<depth;x++)
        document.write('-')
    document.write(node+'<br>')
    neighbours=this.graph[node]

    document.write('exploring '+node +' neighbours' + neighbours +'explored = '+explored)

    for ( i=0;i<neighbours.length;i++){
        document.write('checking'+i+' node is ='+node )
        if(neighbours[i] ==1 && explored[i]!=1)
            this.explore(i,++depth)
    }

}

g = new graph()
g.explore(0,0)  
share|improve this question
1  
by not using var you've set both x and i as global variables. –  generalhenry Feb 8 '11 at 8:49
1  
@generalhenry You should make it an answer, so he can accept it.. if not, I will do it.. mohowhah..mwhahahaha! –  Frode Feb 8 '11 at 9:15
    
also neighbours –  generalhenry Feb 8 '11 at 9:15
    
thanks a lot , and yeah u can make it an anwswer –  Bunny Rabbit Feb 8 '11 at 9:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

by leaving out var you're setting global variables in a recursive function and stepping on your toes, here's the corrected code

function explore(node,depth){

    explored[node]=1
    document.write('<br>')
    for(**var** x=0;x<depth;x++)
        document.write('-')
    document.write(node+'<br>')
    **var** neighbours=this.graph[node]

    document.write('exploring '+node +' neighbours' + neighbours +'explored = '+explored)

    for (**var** i=0;i<neighbours.length;i++){
        document.write('checking'+i+' node is ='+node )
        if(neighbours[i] ==1 && explored[i]!=1)
            this.explore(i,++depth)
    }

}
share|improve this answer

The line this.explore(i,++depth) may also be causing you problems, as you are incrementing depth in the current scope as well as passing the incremented value to the recusive call,

better to use

this.explore(i, depth + 1);

When in doubt with javascript it is always good to check the code with jslint.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, wouldn't that be exactly equivalent? While he doesn't use the depth argument for the actual exploration, I think what he actually wants is this.explore(i, depth + 1) though - so that the depth isn't increased in the calling scope, and indentation will remain correct for that depth. –  Frode Feb 8 '11 at 9:32
    
true, will edit to change –  Zachary K Feb 8 '11 at 10:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.