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I have access to a very large code base stored in a subversion repository. I would like to be able to perform Google type searched on the code base. I have done this before when I have access to the server by creating a network share and using Google desktop.

I currently do not have access to this subversion server box.

Any Ideas?

Some more info

  • The code base is company wide and large
  • Don't want to download the entire code base for the entire business on my laptop
  • My goal understand what code is available inside the company
  • The code changes often

    Wondering if there are any tool that can search remote svn repositories?

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1  
Duplicate to this issue –  Jared Sep 19 '11 at 20:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

FishEye is a pretty well-known tool in this space.

I have also seen people use a search engine indexers (e.g. Lucene) to crawl the repo. Set this up with a post-commit hook to trigger a re-index when the content changes.

As long as the repo can be accessed via http, it can be crawled by most web content indexers. The only problem is that it will only index the HEAD, not older revs. For that, you need an indexing tool that understands the revision structure (that's where FishEye comes in).

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If you don't want to wrap Lucene yourself, consider OpenGrok. I trigger OpenGrok to reindex on Subversion commits. Always have an up-to-date-fast-context-sensitive search engine. –  basszero Mar 4 '09 at 13:44
4  
Fisheye's search is abysmal. At least, it is where I work, maybe they have configured it wrong, but if you search for a filename it will never get the right one, the first result will be a deleted one, or a tag, or a branch, and the trunk version you actually care about will be buried in endless search results from every tag you've ever done ever. –  SCdF Jan 26 '11 at 7:03
    
Same here: used Fisheye in various projects: it was sluggish and IT departments always struggled with the configuration (even if cloud hosted). The only tool that I found useful was "svnquery" which sadly seems to a dead project by now. Was going to test OpenGrok in a next attempt. –  Peter Branforn Mar 9 at 12:03

You could try Supose. It is a subversion indexing and query application in Java. Best of it all, is that it indexes not only the trunk or current snapshots but all revisions.

http://www.supose.org/wiki/supose

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Here's the repo search plugin for trac:

http://trac-hacks.org/wiki/RepoSearchPlugin

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It seems there are some tools, but they do not seem very mature yet. One I have found some time ago is VoilaSVN - search is only a part of it, and its installation does not seem to be ot very straightforward.

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VoilaSVN's web site seems to be discontinued. I get the message "The account is currently not active." –  Helge Klein Dec 10 '10 at 15:05

Why not just check it out to a local drive and use Google Desktop?

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That is one strong option, but I wonder if there are any others tools that can index and search a remote repo. Some of my constraints are - The code base is large - Don't need all of the code for my project - My goal understand the code not own it - the code is company wide and changes often –  Theo Briscoe Jan 29 '09 at 20:49

I use krugle. They have a free VMWare image (Basic). It's a bitch to download and setup (it's big, and the admin interface is a bit clunky), but once set up, searching and seeing activity is pretty good.

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How about using Trac. It has a decent GUI and is open source.

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Trac does not come with repository search per se. –  Ztyx Nov 3 '10 at 13:35

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