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I need to convert one into 1, two into 2 and so on.

Is there a way to do this a library or a class or anything?

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1  
see also: stackoverflow.com/questions/70161/… – tzot Jan 30 '09 at 17:34
    
Maybe this would be helpful: pastebin.com/WwFCjYtt – alvas Oct 26 '15 at 9:42

10 Answers 10

The majority of this code is to set up the numwords dict, which is only done on the first call.

def text2int(textnum, numwords={}):
    if not numwords:
      units = [
        "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight",
        "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen",
        "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen",
      ]

      tens = ["", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"]

      scales = ["hundred", "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion"]

      numwords["and"] = (1, 0)
      for idx, word in enumerate(units):    numwords[word] = (1, idx)
      for idx, word in enumerate(tens):     numwords[word] = (1, idx * 10)
      for idx, word in enumerate(scales):   numwords[word] = (10 ** (idx * 3 or 2), 0)

    current = result = 0
    for word in textnum.split():
        if word not in numwords:
          raise Exception("Illegal word: " + word)

        scale, increment = numwords[word]
        current = current * scale + increment
        if scale > 100:
            result += current
            current = 0

    return result + current

print text2int("seven billion one hundred million thirty one thousand three hundred thirty seven")
#7100031337
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1  
anyway to reincarnate a user just to click the tick? ;) – Bleeding Fingers Oct 7 '13 at 20:50
    
FYI, this won't work with dates. Try: print text2int("nineteen ninety six") # 115 – Nick Ruiz May 13 '14 at 14:26
2  
The correct way of writing 1996 as a number in words is "one thousand nine hundred ninety six". If you want to support years, you'll need different code. – recursive May 13 '14 at 15:08
    
There's a ruby gem by Marc Burns that does it. I recently forked it to add support for years. You can call ruby code from python. – dimid Mar 5 '15 at 20:14

Some earlier posts might be helpful, even though they deal more with turning text to numbers. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/468241/python-convert-alphabetically-spelled-out-numbers-to-numerics

Also a great code snippet from Greg Hewgill at http://github.com/ghewgill/text2num/tree/master

My first post : )

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1  
Nice first post, the links are great. Just a tip - you don't need to click community wiki most of the time (it will prevent you from gaining any rep). See stackoverflow.com/questions/128434/… – Kiv Jan 29 '09 at 22:24

Here's the trivial case approach:

>>> number = {'one':1,
...           'two':2,
...           'three':3,}
>>> 
>>> number['two']
2

Or are you looking for something that can handle "twelve thousand, one hundred seventy-two"?

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Thanks for the code snippet... saved me a lot of time!

I needed to handle a couple extra parsing cases, such as ordinal words ("first", "second"), hyphenated words ("one-hundred"), and hyphenated ordinal words like ("fifty-seventh"), so I added a couple lines:

def text2int(textnum, numwords={}):
    if not numwords:
        units = [
        "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight",
        "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen",
        "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen",
        ]

        tens = ["", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"]

        scales = ["hundred", "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion"]

        numwords["and"] = (1, 0)
        for idx, word in enumerate(units):  numwords[word] = (1, idx)
        for idx, word in enumerate(tens):       numwords[word] = (1, idx * 10)
        for idx, word in enumerate(scales): numwords[word] = (10 ** (idx * 3 or 2), 0)

    ordinal_words = {'first':1, 'second':2, 'third':3, 'fifth':5, 'eighth':8, 'ninth':9, 'twelfth':12}
    ordinal_endings = [('ieth', 'y'), ('th', '')]

    textnum = textnum.replace('-', ' ')

    current = result = 0
    for word in textnum.split():
        if word in ordinal_words:
            scale, increment = (1, ordinal_words[word])
        else:
            for ending, replacement in ordinal_endings:
                if word.endswith(ending):
                    word = "%s%s" % (word[:-len(ending)], replacement)

            if word not in numwords:
                raise Exception("Illegal word: " + word)

            scale, increment = numwords[word]

         current = current * scale + increment
         if scale > 100:
            result += current
            current = 0

    return result + current`
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This could be easily be hardcoded into a dictionary if there's a limited amount of numbers you'd like to parse.

For slightly more complex cases, you'll probably want to generate this dictionary automatically, based on the relatively simple numbers grammar. Something along the lines of this (of course, generalized...)

for i in range(10):
   myDict[30 + i] = "thirty-" + singleDigitsDict[i]

If you need something more extensive, then it looks like you'll need natural language processing tools. This article might be a good starting point.

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This is the c# implementation of the code in 1st answer:

public static double ConvertTextToNumber(string text)
{
    string[] units = new string[] {
        "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight",
        "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen",
        "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen",
    };

    string[] tens = new string[] {"", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"};

    string[] scales = new string[] { "hundred", "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion" };

    Dictionary<string, ScaleIncrementPair> numWord = new Dictionary<string, ScaleIncrementPair>();
    numWord.Add("and", new ScaleIncrementPair(1, 0));
    for (int i = 0; i < units.Length; i++)
    {
        numWord.Add(units[i], new ScaleIncrementPair(1, i));
    }

    for (int i = 1; i < tens.Length; i++)
    {
        numWord.Add(tens[i], new ScaleIncrementPair(1, i * 10));                
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < scales.Length; i++)
    {
        if(i == 0)
            numWord.Add(scales[i], new ScaleIncrementPair(100, 0));
        else
            numWord.Add(scales[i], new ScaleIncrementPair(Math.Pow(10, (i*3)), 0));
    }

    double current = 0;
    double result = 0;

    foreach (var word in text.Split(new char[] { ' ', '-', '—'}))
    {
        ScaleIncrementPair scaleIncrement = numWord[word];
        current = current * scaleIncrement.scale + scaleIncrement.increment;
        if (scaleIncrement.scale > 100)
        {
            result += current;
            current = 0;
        }
    }
    return result + current;
}


public struct ScaleIncrementPair
{
    public double scale;
    public int increment;
    public ScaleIncrementPair(double s, int i)
    {
        scale = s;
        increment = i;
    }
}
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This is what I like - seeing extensions to answers that expand on different ways to implement the same answer. Because the question was already answered, it wouldn't hurt to implement it in a language the inquirer didn't specify. But it does help people who come along to try and implement the code. For helping future readers of this problem, +1 – Joshua Lamusga Aug 30 '13 at 4:32

Made change so that text2int(scale) will return correct conversion. Eg, text2int("hundred") => 100.

import re

numwords = {}


def text2int(textnum):

    if not numwords:

        units = [ "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six",
                "seven", "eight", "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve",
                "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen", "sixteen", "seventeen",
                "eighteen", "nineteen"]

        tens = ["", "", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", 
                "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"]

        scales = ["hundred", "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion", 
                'quadrillion', 'quintillion', 'sexillion', 'septillion', 
                'octillion', 'nonillion', 'decillion' ]

        numwords["and"] = (1, 0)
        for idx, word in enumerate(units): numwords[word] = (1, idx)
        for idx, word in enumerate(tens): numwords[word] = (1, idx * 10)
        for idx, word in enumerate(scales): numwords[word] = (10 ** (idx * 3 or 2), 0)

    ordinal_words = {'first':1, 'second':2, 'third':3, 'fifth':5, 
            'eighth':8, 'ninth':9, 'twelfth':12}
    ordinal_endings = [('ieth', 'y'), ('th', '')]
    current = result = 0
    tokens = re.split(r"[\s-]+", textnum)
    for word in tokens:
        if word in ordinal_words:
            scale, increment = (1, ordinal_words[word])
        else:
            for ending, replacement in ordinal_endings:
                if word.endswith(ending):
                    word = "%s%s" % (word[:-len(ending)], replacement)

            if word not in numwords:
                raise Exception("Illegal word: " + word)

            scale, increment = numwords[word]

        if scale > 1:
            current = max(1, current)

        current = current * scale + increment
        if scale > 100:
            result += current
            current = 0

    return result + current
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I think the correct english spelling of 100 is "one hundred". – recursive Apr 27 '11 at 20:14

There's a ruby gem by Marc Burns that does it. I recently forked it to add support for years. You can call ruby code from python.

  require 'numbers_in_words'
  require 'numbers_in_words/duck_punch'

  nums = ["fifteen sixteen", "eighty five sixteen",  "nineteen ninety six",
          "one hundred and seventy nine", "thirteen hundred", "nine thousand two hundred and ninety seven"]
  nums.each {|n| p n; p n.in_numbers}

results:
"fifteen sixteen" 1615 "eighty five sixteen" 8516 "nineteen ninety six" 1996 "one hundred and seventy nine" 179 "thirteen hundred" 1300 "nine thousand two hundred and ninety seven" 9297

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A quick solution is to use the inflect.py to generate a dictionary for translation.

inflect.py has a number_to_words() function, that will turn a number (e.g. 2) to it's word form (e.g. 'two'). Unfortunately, its reverse (which would allow you to avoid the translation dictionary route) isn't offered. All the same, you can use that function to build the translation dictionary:

>>> import inflect
>>> p = inflect.engine()
>>> word_to_number_mapping = {}
>>>
>>> for i in range(1, 100):
...     word_form = p.number_to_words(i)  # 1 -> 'one'
...     word_to_number_mapping[word_form] = i
...
>>> print word_to_number_mapping['one']
1
>>> print word_to_number_mapping['eleven']
11
>>> print word_to_number_mapping['forty-three']
43

If you're willing to commit some time, it might be possible to examine inflect.py's inner-workings of the number_to_words() function and build your own code to do this dynamically (I haven't tried to do this).

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I have just released a python module to PyPI called word2number for the exact purpose. https://github.com/akshaynagpal/w2n

Install it using:

pip install word2number

make sure your pip is updated to the latest version.

Usage:

from word2number import w2n

print w2n.word_to_num("two million three thousand nine hundred and eighty four")
2003984
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