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According to doc, calendar set() is:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/Calendar.html#set%28int,%20int,%20int%29

set(int year, int month, int date) 
Sets the values for the calendar fields YEAR, MONTH, and DAY_OF_MONTH.

code:

Calendar c1 = GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
c1.set(2000, 1, 30);  //January 30th 2000
Date sDate = c1.getTime();

System.out.println(sDate);

output:

Wed Mar 01 19:32:21 JST 2000

Why it's not Jan 30 ???

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8  
Standard suggestion for anyone using java.util.Date or java.util.Calendar: use Joda Time, available at joda-time.sourceforge.net – mdrg Feb 8 '11 at 10:41
3  
Months are counted from 0, not 1. Yeah, I know - it's annoying. – Goran Jovic Feb 8 '11 at 10:43
    
I'll be starting to use jode for every freaking possible project from now on, the amount of inconsistency and weirdness with date and calendar is just too high! – Warpzit Apr 20 '15 at 18:34
    
oh java why so lame – NimChimpsky Nov 26 '15 at 16:55
up vote 69 down vote accepted

1 for month is February. The 30th of February is changed to 1st of March. You should set 0 for month. The best is to use the constant defined in Calendar:

c1.set(2000, Calendar.JANUARY, 30);
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Thanks! wish java doc can insists such important point! (or i missed that..?) – masato-san Feb 8 '11 at 11:02
1  
@masato-san: You missed that, download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/…. – Adeel Ansari Feb 8 '11 at 11:06

Months in Calendar object start from 0

0 = January = Calendar.JANUARY
1 = february = Calendar.FEBRUARY
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3  
I'm in Tokyo, Japan... – masato-san Feb 8 '11 at 10:39
    
yes, i missed that bit. Months start from 0. 1 is gonna be february. – fmucar Feb 8 '11 at 10:46
    
I will update answer, it is not related to your q. sorry. – fmucar Feb 8 '11 at 10:47

Selected date at the example is interesting. Example code block is:

Calendar c1 = GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
c1.set(2000, 1, 30);  //January 30th 2000
Date sDate = c1.getTime();

System.out.println(sDate);

and output Wed Mar 01 19:32:21 JST 2000.

When I first read the example i think that output is wrong but it is true:). Calendar.Month is starting from 0 so 1 means February. And you know february last day is 28 so output should be 2 March. But selected year is important, it is 2000 which means February 29 so result should be 1 March.

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