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I have searched and searched, but haven't been able to find a solution for my requirement.

I have a plain ol html table. I want to have round corners for it, without using images or js, ie pure css only.

So far i have this:

table {
  -moz-border-radius: 5px !important;
  border-collapse: collapse !important;
  border: none !important;
}
table th, table td { border: none !important }
table th:first-child {
  -moz-border-radius: 5px 0 0 0 !important;
}
table th:last-child {
  -moz-border-radius: 0 5px 0 0 !important;
}
table tr:last-child td:first-child {
  -moz-border-radius: 0 0 0 5px !important;
}
table tr:last-child td:last-child {
  -moz-border-radius: 0 0 5px 0 !important;
}
table tr:hover td { background-color: #ddd !important }

But that leaves me without any borders for the cells. If i add borders, they aren't rounded!

Any solutions?

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1  
Have you tried adding border to the TD elements using moz-border-radius? Also, be aware that this won't work in IE, IE will still show straight edges. –  Fermin Feb 8 '11 at 11:00
    
Looking at the answers and your comments, it's not clear what your want: Where do you want rounded corners ? table, table cells, only cells on the corners of your table ? –  BiAiB Feb 8 '11 at 11:36
    
I guess it's quite obvious from the question title, table corners –  1nfected Feb 8 '11 at 11:54
    
@VishalShah +1 for a really useful question. I was blindly using a jQuery UI rounded corner class designed for the UI widgets, but I applied it to table elements and everything went square. So now I can still use my jQuery UI theme with a table-based widget. –  DavidHyogo Sep 30 '12 at 13:11
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9 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Seems to work fine in FF and Chrome (haven't tested any others) with separate borders: http://jsfiddle.net/7veZQ/3/

Edit: Heres a relatively clean implementation of your sketch: http://jsfiddle.net/MuZzz/1/

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Not exactly what i'm looking for. If you remove the table padding & apply border-radius to the corner cells only, you get 2px thick borders, which is ugly. Rather have no borders at all. –  1nfected Feb 8 '11 at 11:27
    
What are your looking for? Can you provide a sketch? –  RoToRa Feb 8 '11 at 14:06
    
This : dl.dropbox.com/u/19875602/table.png. Rounded corners for corner cells, & 1px thick border for the cells. I do have a solution right now, based on yours, but it's quite messy. –  1nfected Feb 8 '11 at 19:44
    
Added am example of an implementation of your sketch. –  RoToRa Feb 9 '11 at 12:29
1  
Close. The corner cells needed border radius too. jsfiddle.net/JWb4T/1 Though now you see a slight gap between edge of the corner cells & the edge of the table. Can be fixed by reducing the border radius for the corner cells. Thanks :D –  1nfected Feb 9 '11 at 13:50
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Firstly, you'll need more than just -moz-border-radius if you want to support all browsers. You should specify all variants, including plain border-radius, as follows:

-moz-border-radius: 5px;
-webkit-border-radius: 5px;
border-radius: 5px;

Secondly, to directly answer your question, border-radius doesn't actually display a border; it just sets how the corners look of the border, if there is one.

To turn on the border, and thus get your rounded corners, you also need the border attribute on your td and th elements.

td, th {
   border:solid black 1px;
}

You will also see the rounded corners if you have a background colour (or graphic), although of course it would need to be a different background colour to the surrounding element in order for the rounded corners to be visible without a border.

It's worth noting that some older browsers don't like putting border-radius on tables/table cells. It may be worth putting a <div> inside each cell and styling that instead. However this shouldn't affect current versions of any browsers (except IE, that doesn't support rounded corners at all - see below)

Finally, not that IE doesn't support border-radius at all (IE9 beta does, but most IE users will be on IE8 or less). If you want to hack IE to support border-radius, look at http://css3pie.com/

[EDIT]

Okay, this was bugging me, so I've done some testing.

Here's a JSFiddle example I've been playing with

It seems like the critical thing you were missing was border-collapse:separate; on the table element. This stops the cells from linking their borders together, which allows them to pick up the border radius.

Hope that helps.

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To keep the code to a minimum, i've left out the cross-browser stuff. If i give a border to td and th, they aren't rounded. I get straight edges. Could give sample css code for a table with no css applied to it, which would demonstrate what you're saying. –  1nfected Feb 8 '11 at 11:13
    
@Vishal Shah - I have updated my answer after doing some tests. Hope that helps. –  Spudley Feb 9 '11 at 10:06
    
Your example displays a border radius for ALL the cells, where as i want it only for the corner cells. This is what i was looking for: jsfiddle.net/JWb4T/1 –  1nfected Feb 9 '11 at 13:54
    
@Vishal Shah - I understood the problem to be the lack of rounding anywhere on the table, rather than specifically which bits of the table should be rounded. Glad you got it sorted in the end though (it looks like the border-collapse:separate; tip was useful in the end) –  Spudley Feb 9 '11 at 14:46
    
+1 for that border-collapse:separate tip. That really helped me. –  DavidHyogo Sep 30 '12 at 13:09
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For me, the Twitter Bootstrap Solution looks good. It excludes IE < 9 (no round corners in IE 8 and lower), but that's O.K. I think, if you develop prospective Web-Apps.

HTML

<table>
<thead>
<tr><th>xxx</th><th>xxx</th><th>xxx</th></tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td></tr>
<tr><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td></tr>
<tr><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td></tr>
<tr><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td></tr>
<tr><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td><td>xxx</td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>

CSS

table { 
border: 1px solid #ddd;
border-collapse: separate;
border-left: 0;
border-radius: 4px;
border-spacing: 0px;
}
thead {
display: table-header-group;
vertical-align: middle;
border-color: inherit;
border-collapse: separate;
}
tr {
display: table-row;
vertical-align: inherit;
border-color: inherit;
}
th, td {
padding: 5px 4px 6px 4px; 
text-align: left;
vertical-align: top;
border-left: 1px solid #ddd;    
}
td {
border-top: 1px solid #ddd;    
}
thead:first-child tr:first-child th:first-child, tbody:first-child tr:first-child td:first-child {
border-radius: 4px 0 0 0;
}
thead:last-child tr:last-child th:first-child, tbody:last-child tr:last-child td:first-child {
border-radius: 0 0 0 4px;
}

You can play with that here (on jsFiddle)

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Through personal expeirence I've found that it's not possible to round corners of an HTML table cell with pure CSS. Rounding a table's outermost border is possible.

You will have to resort to using images as described in this tutorial, or any similar :)

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1  
+1, and same here, recently have tried to achieve this, but no luck. Had to put inside a <div>. ^^, –  jolt Feb 8 '11 at 11:09
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The best solution I've found for rounded corners and other CSS3 behavior for IE<9 can be found here: http://css3pie.com/

Download the plug-in, copy to a directory in your solution structure. Then in your stylesheet make sure to have the behavior tag so that it pulls in the plug-in.

Simple example from my project which gives me rounded corners, color gradient, and box shadow for my table:

.table-canvas 
{
    -webkit-border-radius: 8px;
    -moz-border-radius: 8px;
    overflow:hidden;
    border-radius: 10px;
    -pie-background: linear-gradient(#ece9d8, #E5ECD8);   
    box-shadow: #666 0px 2px 3px;
    behavior: url(Include/PIE.htc);
    overflow: hidden;
}

Don't worry if your Visual Studio CSS intellisense gives you the green underline for unknown properites, it still works when you run it. Some of the elements are not very clearly documented, but the examples are pretty good, especially on the front page.

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this is css3, only recent non-IE<9 browser will support it.

check out: http://css3please.com/ , it derives the round property for all available browsers

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4  
css3please doesn't do anything for border-radius in IE. If you want to hack IE to support border-radius, look at css3pie.com –  Spudley Feb 8 '11 at 11:02
    
I'm talking about rounded property for a table specifically, not any other element. –  1nfected Feb 8 '11 at 11:17
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The following is something I used that worked for me across browsers so I hope it helps someone in the future:

#contentblock th:first-child {
    -moz-border-radius: 6px 0 0 0;
    -webkit-border-radius: 6px 0 0 0;
    border-radius: 6px 0 0 0;
    behavior: url(/images/border-radius.htc);
    border-radius: 6px 0 0 0;
}

#contentblock th:last-child {
    -moz-border-radius: 0 6px 0 0;
    -webkit-border-radius: 0 6px 0 0;
    border-radius: 0 6px 0 0;
    behavior: url(/images/border-radius.htc);
    border-radius: 0 6px 0 0;
}
#contentblock tr:last-child td:last-child {
     border-radius: 0 0 6px 0;
    -moz-border-radius: 0 0 6px 0;
    -webkit-border-radius: 0 0 6px 0;
    behavior: url(/images/border-radius.htc);
    border-radius: 0 0 6px 0;
 }

#contentblock tr:last-child td:first-child {
    -moz-border-radius: 0 0 0 6px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 0 0 0 6px;
    border-radius: 0 0 0 6px;
    behavior: url(/images/border-radius.htc);
    border-radius: 0 0 0 6px;
}

obviously the #contentblock portion can be replaced/edited as needed and you can find the border-radius.htc file by doing a search in google or your favorite web browser.

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For a bordered and scrollable table, use this (replace variables, $ starting texts)

If you use thead, tfoot or th, just replace tr:first-child and tr-last-child and td with them.

#table-wrap {
  border: $border solid $color-border;
  border-radius: $border-radius;
}
table {
  border-collapse: collapse;
  border-spacing: 0;
}
table td { border: $border solid $color-border; }
table td:first-child { border-left: none; }
table td:last-child { border-right: none; }
table tr:first-child td { border-top: none; }
table tr:last-child td { border-bottom: none; }
table tr:first-child td:first-child { border-top-left-radius: $border-radius; }
table tr:first-child td:last-child { border-top-right-radius: $border-radius; }
table tr:last-child td:first-child { border-bottom-left-radius: $border-radius; }
table tr:last-child td:last-child { border-bottom-right-radius: $border-radius; }

HTML:

<div id=table-wrap>
  <table>
    <tr>
       <td>1</td>
       <td>2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
       <td>3</td>
       <td>4</td>
    </tr>
  </table>
</div>
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CSS:

table {
  border: 1px solid black;
  border-radius: 10px;
  border-collapse: collapse;
  overflow: hidden;
}

td {
  padding: 0.5em 1em;
  border: 1px solid black;
}
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