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following is the structure and I want to create array of this structure in C and initialize, but confuse with how to initialize char **input and char **output.

typedef struct _test_data_vector {
    char *api;
    char **input;
    char **output;
}vector_test_data;

following is what I tried.

typedef struct _test_data_vector {
    char *api;
    char **input;
    char **output;
}vector_test_data;

vector_test_data data[] = {
    {
        "vector_push_back",
        {"1","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","10"},
        {"1","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","10"}
    }
};
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Well, initialize them to what? To an actual string table? Or set them simply to 0? –  Christian Feb 8 '11 at 12:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're very close, just specify type through compound literals (starting from C99)

This what I've tested with no warnings:

typedef struct _test_data_vector {
    char *api;
    char **input;
    char **output;
}vector_test_data;

vector_test_data data[] = {
    {
        "vector_push_back",
        (char*[]){"1","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","10"},
        (char*[]){"1","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","10"}
    }
};

printf("TEST: %s", data[0].input[2]);

Otput: TEST: 3

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No this won't work. It won't be a 2-dimensional array, but rather some ugly typecast abomination. Did you try printf("TEST: %s", data[1].input[0]); –  Lundin Feb 8 '11 at 12:42
    
@Lundin Please revert back my vote, pay attention that you've just run out of data array bounds. It has only one element ! It's not odd at all, just consult this: Compound Literals –  Martin Babacaev Feb 8 '11 at 12:45
    
@Martin Why use pointer-to-pointer syntax if you didn't intend to use multiple dimenstions? If you had declared this correctly, you would have a [10][3] matrix, 10 dimensions with 3 chars in each. Also, this has nothing to do with compound literals, you'd get that same problem no matter, since a pointer-to-pointer is used. –  Lundin Feb 8 '11 at 12:49
    
Please read question with more attention first. I didn't change almost anything, and just respect author's needs. And don't confuse a multidimensional array with an array to a string ! –  Martin Babacaev Feb 8 '11 at 12:51
    
The OP is very likely confused, as most programmers are about this subject... you will have to keep that in mind before giving an answer equally confusing. And as this is C, multidimensional arrays are identical to arrays of strings, it is just a different nomenclature for the very same thing. –  Lundin Feb 8 '11 at 12:54

First, please note that multi-dimensional arrays in C is a complex topic. Most programming courses fail to teach how to use them properly.

Pointer-to-pointer is not compatible with statically allocated multi-dimensional arrays. Those are two different things entirely!

The pointer-to-pointer syntax is usually just used in two scenarios:

  • when returning pointers from functions through one of the passed parameters, and
  • when allocating multi-dimensional arrays dynamically.

So the question is, what do you want to achieve with your code? If you want to handle statically allocated arrays, you would need to do something like this (C90 compatible):

#include <stdio.h>


typedef char (*Str_array)[3];

typedef struct _test_data_vector
{
  char*      api;
  Str_array  input;
  Str_array  output;

}vector_test_data;


int main()
{
  char input_array  [10][3] = {"1","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","10"};
  char output_array [10][3] = {"1","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","10"};

  vector_test_data data =
  {
    "vector_push_back",
    input_array,
    output_array
  };

  unsigned char x;
  unsigned char y;

  for(x=0; x<10; x++)
  {
    y=0;

    while(data.input[x][y] != '\0')
    {
      printf("%c", data.input[x][y]);
      y++;
    }
    printf(" ");
  }

  return 0;
}

This code uses the array pointer syntax, something one rarely sees in C (oddly enough). Here is a link that in detail correctly explains how arrays and pointers work in C:

http://c-faq.com/aryptr/index.html

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1  
Wrong initialization. You forgot to put an extra {} pair for vector_test_data data[] = {"vector_push_back", input_array, output_array }; left initialization expression should be {{"vector_push_back", input_array, output_array }};. Respect author needs. –  Martin Babacaev Feb 8 '11 at 13:15
    
Oops I hadn't realized the OP had declared it as an array. Fixed. –  Lundin Feb 8 '11 at 13:29
char text[] = "Input text";
char *output;
struct _test_data_vector {
    char *api;
    char **input;
    char **output;
};

struct _test_data_vector A = { NULL, &text, &output };

If you want to allocate space for them, you can also do:

struct _test_data_vector B = {
  "api",
  malloc( 5 * sizeof *B.input ),
  malloc( 10 * sizeof *B.output )
};

just make sure you check that the allocation was succesful. (I strongly advised against doing this, as it is much clearer to call malloc in non-initializer code.)

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api, input, and output will, by default, be initialized to NULL. You can initialize api directly, but input and output must be allocated, either at compile time by defining arrays, or at runtime, perhaps via malloc. You really should provide more information about what you are trying to do in order to get a more helpful answer.

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be a little more specific , usually when you have to initialize a pointer to a pointer you do it like this:

char * charPointer;//this is the char you want the input to point at;
*input = charPointer;

I had to use pointer to pointer on a project to but if ther is any way you can avoid this it would be easyer

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