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I am trying to open the file received as argument.

When i store the argument in to the global variable open works successfully.

But

If I use give make it as my open fails to open the file.

What is the reason.

#use strict;
use warnings;

#my $FILE=$ARGV[0];   #open Fails to open the file $FILE

$FILE=$ARGV[0];        #Works Fine with Global $FILE
open(FILE)
    or
die "\n ". "Cannot Open the file specified :ERROR: $!". "\n";
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6  
This style of perl is way obsolete. You would be much better off doing open my $file, "<", $ARGV[ 0 ]...or better yet don't call open at all and just read from ARGV. (Perl assumes the arguments are files to be opened for input, and opens them automagically for you.) –  William Pursell Feb 8 '11 at 13:50
1  
Unary open is documented to work only on package variables. –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 15:51
    
@William: Oughtn’t there be an encoding there? open(FH, "< :encoding(UTF-8)", $pathname) –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 15:52
    
@tchrist Good catch, and it makes a strong argument in favor of just reading from ARGV. –  William Pursell Feb 8 '11 at 15:58
    
@William: Setting the encoding on ARGV is a bit tricky: it generally requires the PERL_UNICODE envariable or the corresponding perl ‑CSD command-line flag, but those only work if we’re talking UTF‑8. The use open pragma, however, can handle alternate encodings. To pass that in with an envariable requires a bit of sneakiness: PERL5OPT='-Mopen=:std,IN,:encoding(MacRoman),OUT,:utf8' works. –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 16:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Unary open works only on package (global) variables. This is documented on the manpage.

A better way to open a file for reading would be:

my $filename = $ARGV[0];           # store the 1st argument into the variable
open my $fh, '<', $filename or die $!; # open the file using lexically scoped filehandle

print <$fh>; # print file contents

P.S. always use strict and warnings while debugging your Perl scripts.

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2  
This answer misses the point. The simple question was why unary open works only with package variables. The simple answer is that it is because it is thus documented. All else is frosting on a missing cake. –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 15:53
    
@tchrist: ok, I added this to the answer –  eugene y Feb 8 '11 at 16:10
    
Thanks. I don’t usually downvote answers that have made a good try at it (which is why I didn’t do so here). I prefer pointing out what they missed. Thanks for fixing it. –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 16:17

It's all in perldoc -f open:

If EXPR is omitted, the scalar variable of the same name as the FILEHANDLE contains the filename. (Note that lexical variables--those declared with "my"--will not work for this purpose; so if you're using "my", specify EXPR in your call to open.)

Note that this isn't a very good way to specify the file name. As you can see, it has a hard constraint on the variable type it's in, and either the global variable it requires or the global filehandle it opens are usually best avoided.

Using a lexical filehandle keeps its scope in control, and handles closing automatically:

open my $fh, '<', "filename" or die "string involving $!";

And if you're taking that file name from the command line, you could possibly do away with that open or any handle altogether, and use the plain <> operator to read from command-line arguments or STDIN. (see comments for more on this)

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Good point: It’s usually a lot better to use magic ARGV than an explicit open. But add if (!@ARGV && -t STDIN) { warn "$0: reading from stdin...\n" } to help people whose systems lack a proper ^T tty char. However, magic ARGV only uses stdin when @ARGV is initially empty, not when it is exhausted; your answer suggests otherwise. –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 16:01
    
@tchrist: yes and no... after <> exhausted ARGV and returned undef once (what you were saying), it'll start again, with an empty @ARGV if you haven't done anything about it, hence fall back to STDIN (what I was saying). I'd concede most people won't get past the first undef spontaneously and edit. –  JB. Feb 8 '11 at 16:12
    
Um, I do know how <> works. :) –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 16:18
    
I have no doubt you do. :) I was just defending what I initially wrote wasn't that off. –  JB. Feb 8 '11 at 16:28
use strict;
use warnings;

my $file_name = shift @ARGV;
open(my $file, '<', $file_name) or die $!;
…
close($file);

Always use strict and warnings. If either of them complains, fix the code, do not comment out the pragmas. You can also use autodie to avoid the explicit or die after open, see autodie.

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1  
+1 and it needs to be said again: If strict complains, it means that you need to fix your code, not that you need to comment out strict. –  Dave Sherohman Feb 8 '11 at 15:36
    
I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again: This answer misses the point. The simple question was why unary open works only with package variables. The simple answer is that it is because it is thus documented. All else is frosting on a missing cake. Also, you forgot to specify the encoding as in open(FH, "< :encoding(UTF-8)", $path). And if one is being so very careful, shouldn’t one also test @ARGV for reasonility? Finally, how can you know they do NOT want to allow filenames like - in the standard Unix fashion of specifying std{in,out,whatever}? –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 15:54
1  
Also, this is a really bad idiom. Perl already handles automatically opening files listed as arguments via ARGV. In perl, there is almost never a good reason to explicitly open a file whose name is given in @ARGV –  William Pursell Feb 8 '11 at 16:00
1  
It’s not meant as an idiom. And chances are that showing a user how to open a file could be more helpful than telling him that “unary open is documented to work only on package variables.” Or maybe not, but that’s what we have multiple answers for after all. –  zoul Feb 8 '11 at 16:39
    
@zoul I agree that it is good to give examples, and my comment was not meant to be a criticism of your response so much as a warning to the unwary reader. Much perl code seems to be written by people who do not know that perl does a lot of this work for free. –  William Pursell Feb 8 '11 at 20:21

From Perl's docs for open()

If EXPR is omitted, the scalar variable of the same name as the FILEHANDLE contains the filename. (Note that lexical variables--those declared with my--will not work for this purpose; so if you're using my, specify EXPR in your call to open.)

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Succinct, correct, and to the point. –  tchrist Feb 8 '11 at 16:03

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