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I am working on a project currently on SVN. I however will not have access to the internet for a few days, and will be working on my project.

Is there any way to make a clone of the repository on my local machine, commit changes to it, and when I gain access to the internet "push" them onto the shared repository? Thinking in terms of Mercurial here, is it worth migrating completely?!

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Why would you need a clone of the repository? If you update your working copy just before you leave, travel around the world in 80 hours, doing your work and then update, merge and commit when you have access to SVN again you will be fine. –  rene Feb 8 '11 at 14:31
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Because he wants to do offline commits of the changes instead of one big changeset all at the end. –  Mark Loeser Feb 8 '11 at 14:35
    
because I commit on small changes and hence would need to commit on my repository while travelling ... and hence would need a local repository (probably the cloned one) to commit to. –  Karan Feb 8 '11 at 14:37
    
Ok, so you take with you 100 Bugs and want to have a commit for every bug? In that case my option is rubbish. If your workpackages are smaller (a couple) create branches for every workpackage, make your changes on the appropiate branch, when back home update, commit, re-integrate branches. You can ignore me, I'm just resisting to change... ( a new tool for every new problem) :-) –  rene Feb 8 '11 at 15:02
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6 Answers 6

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Your problem sounds to me like the use case for git-svn:

  • set up your Git repo: git svn clone http://svn.example.com/project/trunk
  • while being online, commit your changes to SVN
  • before going offline, do a git svn rebase to get your Git repo in sync with the SVN repo
  • while being offline, commit to the Git repo using git commit
  • when getting back online again, do a git svn dcommit to push your changes back to the SVN repo

I'm using this workflow daily!

You get two huge advantages doing so:

  • your complete SVN history is backed up in the Git repo and in every Git repo that gets cloned from that one
  • while being offline, you can view the commit messages, checkout other branches, etc.
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+1 Yes, this is exactly what git-svn was made for. I started using git for this exact reason, and it works great. –  sleske Mar 30 '12 at 9:07
    
What if, say, I have the SVN checked out copy locally. Now I do not have access to the server. Now I want the same thing as above and also create a new branch. Is it possible? –  karim Nov 11 '13 at 14:14
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Ridiculous answer would be to migrate to another versioning tool, no offence!

I had the exact issue.
Been using SVN on my "real" server where the "real" repository is.
When I went out with my laptop, without internet I would simply duplicate the "real" repository on this laptop (VisualSVN + TortoiseSVN), work on it, change/commit whatever, and when come back simply "sync" the new 'revision' files to the "real" repository.

To be a bit more clear: Have two SVN servers, one locally on your laptop (the clone) and one on your "real" server (obviously). Just sync between the two.

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This works only as long as on any point in time only one server receives new changesets. This scheme breaks if at the same time when you are offline and commit changes to your clone, someone commits changes to the same paths in the original repo. –  Rudi Feb 9 '11 at 8:46
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how do you sync two svn clones? As @Rudi said, what if somone else commits to the original repo? –  Karan Feb 24 '12 at 11:17
    
My approach assumes you're the sole committer. Otherwise it could break as Rudi suggests. –  Poni Mar 29 '12 at 15:10
    
... and I sync the two svn clones by copying files, simply. –  Poni Mar 29 '12 at 15:10
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That sounds like dangerous advice. You are essentially (badly) reimplementing a DVCS on to of Subversion. –  sleske Mar 30 '12 at 9:08
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You can access svn repositories with mercurial.

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+1, In my experience hgsubversion works better than hgsvn. –  Rudi Feb 9 '11 at 9:16
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I've been using git on a project that uses SVN for the same reason you describe above. There is some getting used to git/mercurial but after a while I really like the new approach. Further I never had any issues with using git-svn, never have tried mercurial and svn..

If you are onto Mercurial and are still looking for a good tutorial with one or two chuckles in between check out this tutorial written by Joel Spolsky. And as mentioned before, surely is a great opportunity to get started with DVCS.

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There's always SVK as well. I haven't used it in years though, so I'm not sure of how well it works anymore.

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SVK is discontinued. –  Max Beikirch Jul 11 '13 at 10:28
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Hehehe, a good time to discover mercurial or git for yourself!!

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one of the things that annoys me about mercurial is that you cannot change the commit summary. I find this important since it makes easier to track which commits are part of which task. Is there a better revision/task control approach on Mercurial? –  Karan Feb 8 '11 at 14:40
    
@Newton Sorry for asking, but what exactly is a commit summary? I only know of the textual commit message, which is supported as it is in svn –  phihag Feb 8 '11 at 23:00
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