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In debugging my program with Valgrind, I have discovered a memory leak despite what I thought were effective calls to free. First, the code that is allocating the memory and storing it:

    row = malloc(sizeof(Row));
    row->columns = malloc(sizeof(char*) * headcnt);
    row->numcol  = 0;

    ...

    row->numcol    = colcnt;
    rows           = realloc(rows, (rowcnt+1) * sizeof(Row));
    rows[rowcnt++] = *row;

The code responsible for attempting to free the memory:

void cleanUp(){
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < rowcnt; i++){
        for (j = 0; j < rows[i].numcols; j++){
            free(rows[i].columns[j]);
        }
        free(&rows[i]);
    }
    free(rows); 
    exit(0);
}

The declaration of Row:

typedef struct {
    char** columns;
    unsigned short int numcol;
} Row;

Row* rows = NULL;

Worse still, this program sometimes causes a glibc error at free(&rows[i]) that complains of a double free. I am new to C, and would appreciate any pointers (ahem) someone might have.

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1  
You need to include the declaration of the Row type. –  unwind Feb 8 '11 at 14:30
    
Have you tried clang? –  ustun Feb 8 '11 at 14:39
    
Could do with more of the code here. At the moment I'm a bit confused why you malloc space for each column in a row then set row->numcol to zero. –  GrahamS Feb 8 '11 at 14:39
1  
free() knows the block size of memory that malloc() allocated and will deallocate the whole block. It looks like you are iterating over the block and try to deallocate parts of the memory block. –  Lucas Feb 8 '11 at 14:54
1  
@ustun: I like clang too, but how would this help here? –  Lucas Feb 8 '11 at 14:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Doing rows[rowcnt++] = *row; effectively makes a copy of the memory you allocated. Your array rows should be an array of pointers. Also like Oli Chalesworth pointed out, you free for columns should be a single free for all the columns.

rows = malloc(count * sizeof(Row*)); // This is probably done somewhere

row->columns = malloc(sizeof(char*) * headcnt);
row->numcol  = 0;

...

row->numcol    = colcnt;
rows           = realloc(rows, (rowcnt+1) * sizeof(Row*));
rows[rowcnt++] = row;

Now if your cleanup

void cleanUp(){
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < rowcnt; i++){
        free(rows[i]->columns);
    }
    free(rows); 
    exit(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very helpful, thank you. –  zchtodd Feb 8 '11 at 14:53
    
Don't free(rows[i])!!! –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 8 '11 at 16:22
    
@Oli, true! I will fix my code –  Rod Feb 8 '11 at 16:25

Every call to malloc (or realloc) must be matched with a corresponding call to free. If you dynamically allocate an array thus:

int *p = malloc(sizeof(int) * NUM);

You free it like this:

free(p);

Not like this:

for (int i = 0; i < NUM; i++)
{
    free(p[i]);
}

It appears that you are doing this incorrectly. I suspect that your cleanup code ought to be:

void cleanUp(){
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < rowcnt; i++){
        for (j = 0; j < rows[i].numcols; j++){
            free(rows[i].columns[j]); // Free whatever rows[i].columns[j] points to
        }
        free(rows[i].columns); // Matches row->columns = malloc(sizeof(char*) * headcnt);
    }
    free(rows);  // Matches rows = realloc(rows, (rowcnt+1) * sizeof(Row));
    exit(0);
}

Also, there is no way to match the row = malloc(sizeof(Row));. I suspect that your allocation code ought to be:

row->numcol    = colcnt;
rows           = realloc(rows, (rowcnt+1) * sizeof(Row));
rows[rowcnt].columns = malloc(sizeof(char*) * headcnt);
rows[rowcnt].numcol = 0;
rowcnt++;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, your answer cleared up my misconception on freeing dynamically allocated arrays. –  zchtodd Feb 8 '11 at 14:55

Maybe I'm being dense, but isn't this totally unnecessary? All of your memory will be released as soon as the program exits, anyway.

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4  
Which is fair, because if you don't tidy up this memory then how are you supposed to spot real memory leaks when they occur? It's like having 50 warnings from the compiler that you ignore because you know they are "okay". When warning 51 shows up it just gets lost in the noise. –  GrahamS Feb 8 '11 at 14:36
3  
To end the discussion in a clear matter, the issue of freeing or not doesn't matter at all in this question's context. The OP asked specifically how to correctly free the used space and not if he should or should not free it. :-) –  Shinnok Feb 8 '11 at 15:02
1  
"doesn't matter if it's part of a bigger application - exit() semantics won't be changed by that..." -- missing the point; in a real application, exit may be called much later. "manually calling free() unecessarily ties up resources" -- What the heck are you talking about? –  Jim Balter Feb 8 '11 at 15:26
1  
"maybe what the op posted is only a subset of a bigger application?" ... "And maybe I'm a space alien." -- What the OP posted may in fact be only a subset of a bigger application, whereas there's no chance that you're a space alien ... but if you are one, you're a rude one. –  Jim Balter Feb 8 '11 at 15:30
2  
see c-faq.com/malloc/freeb4exit.html on the issue of 2free-or-!2free –  Christoph Feb 8 '11 at 16:40

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