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I know there is nothing wrong with writing with proper function structure, but I would like to know how can I find nth fibonacci number with most Pythonic way with a one-line.

I wrote that code, but It didn't seem to me best way:

>>> fib=lambda n:reduce(lambda x,y:(x[0]+x[1],x[0]),[(1,1)]*(n-2))[0]
>>> fib(8)
13

How could it be better and simplier?

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+1 for interesting exercise that taught me some new things about python –  Jason S Feb 8 '11 at 17:25
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12 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted
fib = lambda n:reduce(lambda x,n:[x[1],x[0]+x[1]], range(n),[0,1])[0]

(this maintains a tuple mapped from [a,b] to [b,a+b], initialized to [0,1], iterated N times, then takes the first tuple element)

>>> fib(1000)
43466557686937456435688527675040625802564660517371780402481729089536555417949051
89040387984007925516929592259308032263477520968962323987332247116164299644090653
3187938298969649928516003704476137795166849228875L

(note that in this numbering, fib(0) = 0, fib(1) = 1, fib(2) = 1, fib(3) = 2, etc.)

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But didn't really understand the solution, x is an integer from [0,1]+range(n), right(I think my mistake is at here)? But we use x[1],x[0]. How? I can't see how we maintain a tuple. –  utdemir Feb 8 '11 at 17:38
2  
reduce's input function takes two arguments, an accumulator and an input: reduce calls the function for each element in the iterable (which is range(n) in this case.) The accumulator in this case is x, which is a tuple, initialized at [0,1]. The function in reduce() outputs a new tuple [x[1],x[0]+x[1]]. –  Jason S Feb 8 '11 at 18:00
    
Jason S, thanks –  utdemir Feb 8 '11 at 20:09
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A rarely seen trick is that a lambda function can refer to itself recursively:

fib = lambda n: n if n < 2 else fib(n-1) + fib(n-2)

By the way, it's rarely seen because it's confusing, and in this case it is also inefficient. It's much better to write it on multiple lines:

def fibs():
    a = 0
    b = 1
    while True:
        yield a
        a, b = b, a + b
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+1 for trick, but this has O(exp(n)) growth in runtime –  Jason S Feb 8 '11 at 17:09
    
1->n, 2->1 allows for fib(0) = 0. –  DSM Feb 8 '11 at 17:09
    
@Jason S, @DSM: Thanks for the comments. Updated answer. –  Mark Byers Feb 8 '11 at 17:13
    
+1 for the generator, I've always found it the most elegant and efficient way to represent the Fibonacci sequence in Python. –  Rafe Kettler Feb 8 '11 at 17:13
    
+1 for something that works on fib(0),fib(1),fib(2) unlike OP –  Rod Feb 8 '11 at 17:24
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If we consider the "most Pythonic way" to be elegant and effective then:

def fib(nr):
    return int(((1 + math.sqrt(5)) / 2) ** nr / math.sqrt(5) + 0.5)

wins hands down. Why use a inefficient algorithm (and if you start using memoization we can forget about the oneliner) when you can solve the problem just fine in O(1) by approximation the result with the golden ratio? Though in reality I'd obviously write it in this form:

def fib(nr):
    ratio = (1 + math.sqrt(5)) / 2
    return int(ratio ** nr / math.sqrt(5) + 0.5)

More efficient and much easier to understand.

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I thought about the explicit Fibonacci formula too, but it has precision problems for large n. –  Jason S Feb 8 '11 at 17:16
1  
It has precision problems for small n; fib(71) is wrong. If we're only required to be correct for the first few terms, then def fib(n): return [0, 1, 1, 2, 3, ..][n] is even simpler.. [Updated to address change from round to int in code.] –  DSM Feb 8 '11 at 17:19
    
thanks,actually my main purpose is exploring Python's abilities, not fast calculation :). +1 –  utdemir Feb 8 '11 at 17:21
    
Ok that was short sighted - tested it only for the first 60 values and assumed if it worked there we wouldn't run into precision problems for larger values. Well so much for that. And yeah changed the formula because I thought it should work fine without the explicit rounding. –  Voo Feb 8 '11 at 17:24
    
Why do you think memoization rules out a one liner? –  6502 May 24 '12 at 6:21
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This is a non-recursive (anonymous) memoizing one liner

fib = lambda x,y=[1,1]:([(y.append(y[-1]+y[-2]),y[-1])[1] for i in range(1+x-len(y))],y[x])[1]
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I recently learned about using matrix multiplication to generate Fibonacci numbers, which was pretty cool. You take a base matrix:

[1, 1]
[1, 0]

and multiply it by itself N times to get:

[F(N+1), F(N)]
[F(N), F(N-1)]

This morning, doodling in the steam on the shower wall, I realized that you could cut the running time in half by starting with the second matrix, and multiplying it by itself N/2 times, then using N to pick an index from the first row/column.

With a little squeezing, I got it down to one line:

import numpy

def mm_fib(n):
    return (numpy.matrix([[2,1],[1,1]])**(n/2))[0,(1,0)[n%2]]

>>> [mm_fib(i) for i in range(20)]
[0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, 1597, 2584, 4181]
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fib = lambda n, x=0, y=1 : x if not n else fib(n-1, y, x+y)

run time O(n), fib(0) = 0, fib(1) = 1, fib(2) = 1 ...

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Another example, taking the cue from Mark Byers's answer:

fib = lambda n,a=0,b=1: a if n<=0 else fib(n-1,b,a+b)
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...although it seems to have recursion depth problems at n=999. Doesn't Python have tail-recursion? –  Jason S Feb 8 '11 at 17:31
2  
No, it doesn't have tail recursion elimination. –  delnan Feb 8 '11 at 18:42
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Here's an implementation that doesn't use recursion, and only memoizes the last two values instead of the whole sequence history.

nthfib() below is the direct solution to the original problem (as long as imports are allowed)

It's less elegant than using the Reduce methods above, but, although slightly different that what was asked for, it gains the ability to to be used more efficiently as an infinite generator if one needs to output the sequence up to the nth number as well (re-writing slightly as fibgen() below).

from itertools import imap, islice, repeat

nthfib = lambda n: next(islice((lambda x=[0, 1]: imap((lambda x: (lambda setx=x.__setitem__, x0_temp=x[0]: (x[1], setx(0, x[1]), setx(1, x0_temp+x[1]))[0])()), repeat(x)))(), n-1, None))    

>>> nthfib(1000)
43466557686937456435688527675040625802564660517371780402481729089536555417949051
89040387984007925516929592259308032263477520968962323987332247116164299644090653
3187938298969649928516003704476137795166849228875L


from itertools import imap, islice, repeat

fibgen = lambda:(lambda x=[0,1]: imap((lambda x: (lambda setx=x.__setitem__, x0_temp=x[0]: (x[1], setx(0, x[1]), setx(1, x0_temp+x[1]))[0])()), repeat(x)))()

>>> list(islice(fibgen(),12))
[1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144]
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To solve this problem I got inspired by a similar question here in Stackoverflow Single Statement Fibonacci, and I got this single line function that can output a list of fibonacci sequence. Though, this is a Python 2 script, not tested on Python 3:

(lambda n, fib=[0,1]: fib[:n]+[fib.append(fib[-1] + fib[-2]) or fib[-1] for i in range(n-len(fib))])(10)

assign this lambda function to a variable to reuse it:

fib = (lambda n, fib=[0,1]: fib[:n]+[fib.append(fib[-1] + fib[-2]) or fib[-1] for i in range(n-len(fib))])
fib(10)

output is a list of fibonacci sequence:

[0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34]
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def fib(n):
    x =[0,1]
    for i in range(n):
        x=[x[1],x[0]+x[1]]
    return x[0]

take the cue from Jason S, i think my version have a better understanding.

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Similar:

    def fibonacci(n):
      f=[1]+[0]
      for i in range(n):
        f=[sum(f)] + f[:-1]
      print f[1]
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def fib(n):
    current = 0
    after = 1
    for i in range(0, n):
        current, after = after, current + after
    return current
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