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They both do the same thing. Is one way better? Obviously if I write the code I'll know what I did, but how about someone else reading it?

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
{
    return Redirect(returnUrl);
}
return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");

OR

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
{
   return Redirect(returnUrl);
}
else
{
    return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
}
share|improve this question
    
It's a side point but I never got the space-after-the-if thing... –  Owen Jan 29 '09 at 22:07
    
The space between the "if" (and other keywords) and the following "(" helps distinguish the keyword usage from a function call (no space = function call). In some editors, that space is the only distinction. –  Rob Williams Jan 29 '09 at 22:10
    
I think that the first one is the cleanest approach. The second uses a double-negative and makes you think that little bit more. –  Fortyrunner Jan 29 '09 at 23:26
    
Oops. Just read a comment further down that points out both have dbl negative! –  Fortyrunner Jan 29 '09 at 23:27
    
This is lame question. I remeber people from my firm staring and pondering 1h+ , how should they modify simple part of 3 lines of code that calculates difference between two dates. OMFG –  Luka Rahne Oct 20 '09 at 22:24

17 Answers 17

up vote 30 down vote accepted
return String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl) ? 
			RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall") : 
			Redirect(returnUrl);

I prefer that.

Or the alternative:

return String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl)  
			? RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall")  
			: Redirect(returnUrl);
share|improve this answer
6  
This is less readable than either of the options listed in the question. –  Bruce Alderman Jan 29 '09 at 21:56
    
Only if you're not intimately familiar with the ternary ?: operator. I personally find it clearer. –  Andrew Rollings Jan 29 '09 at 21:57
    
I like it better too (deleted my exactly that same answer) –  Ray Jan 29 '09 at 21:58
1  
IMO, familiarity with the language should be a given, not familiarity with the code. Any common constructs should be obvious to a reader. –  Andrew Rollings Jan 29 '09 at 21:59
    
It's not so much the ternary operator. All the parentheses and the very long line make your code less readable. But it comes down to a matter of taste. –  Dana Jan 29 '09 at 22:00

I believe it's better to remove the not (negation) and get the positive assertion first:

if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
{
   return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
}
else
{
    return Redirect(returnUrl);
}

-or-

// Andrew Rollings solution
return String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl) ? 
                    RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall") : 
                    Redirect(returnUrl);
share|improve this answer
    
Why is that the right way? I much prefer the common case at the top. –  Ray Jan 29 '09 at 22:01
1  
+1 I think the negation is a bigger issue concerning 'cleanliness' then the braces. –  Daan Jan 29 '09 at 22:01
    
Positive assertion should be at the top. –  Gavin Miller Jan 29 '09 at 22:02
    
I don't know - I prefer the other way: if (expected case) ... else ... even if it does add an extra ! operator. –  mbeckish Jan 29 '09 at 22:02
    
I believe (and don't quote me on this) but the common case at the top is legacy from the days were processors couldn't optimize the best path (IE poor pipelining) - IMHO it's just not relevant anymore. –  Gavin Miller Jan 29 '09 at 22:04

One style issue:

if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
{
    return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
}
return Redirect(returnUrl);

When you cancel out the double negation it reads a whole lot better, no matter which brace style you choose. Code that reads better is always best ;)

share|improve this answer
    
This also has the advantage (at least in this example) of making the common case the default return. –  Bruce Alderman Jan 29 '09 at 22:25
2  
I like this one the best, out of all of the variations. It's clean, consistent, obvious and easily readable. –  Paul W Homer Jan 30 '09 at 3:46
    
Agreed. I didn't notice the ! since I thought it was more about the bracing. –  kenny Jan 30 '09 at 11:00
    
There's no surprises, which I think is important... –  krosenvold Jan 30 '09 at 23:34
    
This also follows the pattern to return as soon as possible to keep the program flow clear. –  VVS Jul 2 '09 at 15:21

the second way is better, no confusion about what you mean...

share|improve this answer
    
+1 An explicit else is always better for readability by the unfamiliar –  cdeszaq Jan 29 '09 at 21:56
    
Well, I'd still disagree. Forced to choose between the two I'd pick the first. –  Andrew Rollings Jan 29 '09 at 21:58
    
I'm with Andrew. I prefer the guard clause at the top. The 'return' does the work of the 'else'. –  Matt Hamilton Jan 29 '09 at 21:58
    
yes of course logically they do the same thing. but the question asked about someone else picking up this code and figuring out what was meant. Its simply a fact: for a random reader, you have a higher chance of confusion using the first version vs the second –  Scott Evernden Jan 29 '09 at 22:01
    
It's certainly not a fact. I find the first slightly easier to understand. –  recursive Jan 29 '09 at 22:02

I think this is a fairly small matter of style. I'd argue that your two samples are equally readable.

I prefer the former, but other people prefer only one exit point from a function and would probably suggest something like:

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
{
   result = Redirect(returnUrl);
}
else
{
    result = RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
}

return result;
share|improve this answer
    
I was half through writing that exact code sample. The single exit point can make for a nasty nested mess of conditionals sometimes. –  Adam Hawes Jan 29 '09 at 22:45
    
I'd argue that single exit point makes for a nasty mess nearly all the time. I think it's a holdover from trying to tame the use of goto. –  rmeador Jan 29 '09 at 23:16
    
Oh, I agree with you guys. I meant to point out another common way of writing this kind of thing. –  Dana Jan 29 '09 at 23:19

I like the first example because it's more obvious that this excerpt will return. If both returns are in indented blocks, it takes just a little more mental effort to tell.

share|improve this answer
    
This was exactly my thoughts. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Jan 29 '09 at 22:12
    
That's actually a pretty nice defense for the first example. I intuitively prefer that, but I never really found a way to explain my preference to others. Thanks! +1 –  Erik van Brakel Jan 30 '09 at 0:53
    
+1 Yes, I always think there is something missing after the closing else }. –  kenny Jan 30 '09 at 10:59

Eliminate the 'double-negative' and use the fully-expanded style. I am sure most compilers now can suitably optimize the code on your behalf, so no reason to take short-cuts for readability.

share|improve this answer

If it's the entirety of the method then I'd say the second (using the else) is a bit more elegant. If you have preceding code or (especially) much more code before the return in the else case, I'd say it's better not to put the else. Keeps from code becoming too indented.

i.e. either:

void myfunc()
{
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
    {
        return Redirect(returnUrl);
    }
    else
    {
        return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
    }
}

or

void myfunc()
{
    // ... maybe some code here ...

    if(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
    {
       return Redirect(returnUrl);
    }

    // ... a bunch of other code ...

    return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
}
share|improve this answer

This code feels messy because of the unavoidable double-negative logic (and shuffling things around isn't going to clear it up). Whichever arrangement you use, I think you should add some comments so that the reader doesn't need to do a double-take:

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
{
  // hooray, we have a URL
  return Redirect(returnUrl);
}
else
{
  // no url, go to the default place
  return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
}
share|improve this answer

How about:

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
    return Redirect(returnUrl);
else
    return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
share|improve this answer
2  
I would recommend you to use the brackets ALWAYS... –  OscarRyz Jan 29 '09 at 22:01
    
Hmmmm. For the sake of sustainability, this is something I'd stay away from. It's a good rule, typically, to always enclose these types of statements in braces. Just Google C/C++ coding standards and you'll find this to be a common theme. –  user22810 Jan 29 '09 at 22:04
    
Ditto. Always put braces. –  Owen Jan 29 '09 at 22:06
    
Agreed about using braces. If you ever have to add a line before the return, you'll appreciate having them. –  Bruce Alderman Jan 29 '09 at 22:27

Don't think there's a better way... it depend on each developer. That's why before starting a project you should decide what is the coding standard ...

share|improve this answer

As here, but more readable:

return
  string.isNullorEmpty(returnUrl) ? 
     RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall") :
     Redirect(returnUrl);

This way works, is readable and non-redundant.

share|improve this answer

I like the first better.

if ( ) 
{
    return ... 
}
return

For me it reads like a "default" you can chain more conditions but at the end there is a default.

Of course it is a matter of style.

Additional question.

Is it C# style to put the square brackets and in a single line?

if ( ) 
{
}
else
{
}

I have seen this permeated into Java code samples in SO, and I'm wondering this is the root cause.

EDIT

@Owen. I mean, Is it C# style using this form?

if ()  
{
    code ... 
}
else
{
    code...
}

Rather than this ( which would be Java preffered )

if ( ) { 
    code ... 
} else { 
   code ...
}

I have had some arguments in the past about this, but most of the times, only with people that come from C# background.

share|improve this answer
    
Not necessarily C# style, just good style regardless of the (C-esque) language. See the comments to mbeckish's reply. –  Owen Jan 29 '09 at 22:13

From a maintenance perspective I prefer the first version. I've seen less errors with a consistent "get out early" style.

The ternary operator (?:) is OK, but only if it is very unlikely that new code will be inserted before the 2nd return statement. Otherwise when the time comes to add something new into the 2nd code path, the ternary statement has to go back to being an if/else block anyway.

share|improve this answer

When I have only one line sometimes I compact the if statement like this:

if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl)) { 
  return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall"); 
}
else{ return Redirect(returnUrl); }

Although when I look at it, Andrew Rollings might have the best solution although I had never thought of using it until today.

share|improve this answer

LFSR's "else" solution is the most maintainable and readable.

Using a separate else clause allows logic to be added without inadvertently changing the flow. And it's bad enough having multiple exit points without hiding two of them in a single ternary operator statement!

share|improve this answer

The first one. You don't need any else if you are returning a value inside the if statement. So:

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
    return Redirect(returnUrl);
return RedirectToAction("Open", "ServiceCall");
share|improve this answer
    
ewww... wash your mouth out with soap! –  Andrew Rollings Jan 29 '09 at 23:07
    
interesting... did you deleted the offending comments? or you're just saying it because of the code I suggest, that btw is how the Linux kernel creator suggest it has to be :) –  igorgue Jan 30 '09 at 17:04

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