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I have a StreamWriter which gets written to.

When the line count gets to 500 it closes it and moves the file.

I have added a timer as well so every 5 seconds it closes it and moves the file.

Obviously if the timer kicks in and closes the StreamWriter and then in MyMethod it tries to write to the StreamWriter it will throw a wobbly. I have therefore added some locks in to try and prevent any issues so if the timer kicks in it closes the StreamWriter, allocates a new file name and then after the lock if MyMethod tries to write to it all should be ok.

Is the below code good enough to handle any issues do you think?

    private readonly object objLock = new object();

    private StartUpMethod()
    {
        if (tmFileWriter == null)
        {
         tmFileWriter = new Timer(5000);
         tmFileWriter.AutoReset = false;
         tmFileWriter.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(tmFileWriter_Elapsed);
        }
    }

    private void MyMethod()
    {
        lock (objLock)
        {
           if (_tempFilename == "")
           {
              _tempFilename = GenerateFileName();
             _tw = new System.IO.StreamWriter(_tempFilename);
           }
        }

         //Do some processing

         lock (objLock)
         {
            _tw.WriteLine(sql);
            _filelineCount++;
            if (_filelineCount > 500)
            {
               _tw.Close();
               System.IO.File.Move(_tempFilename, _tempFilename.Replace(".tmp", ".sql"));
               _tempFilename = "";
               _filelineCount = 0;
            }
   }

    private void tmFileWriter_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        tmFileWriter.Stop();

        lock (objLock)
        {
            if (_tw != null)
            {
                _tw.Close();
                 System.IO.File.Move(_tempFilename, _tempFilename.Replace(".tmp", ".sql"));
                 _tempFilename = GenerateFileName();
                 _tw = new StreamWriter(_tempFilename);
             }
        }

        tmFileWriter.Start();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What is a "wobbly"? –  siride Feb 8 '11 at 17:18
    
Exception, Error, Black Hole :-) –  Jon Feb 8 '11 at 17:22
    
@Jon: But why "wobbly"? Is that some sort of Cockney rhyming slang? –  siride Feb 8 '11 at 17:22
1  
yup more English slang I'd say –  Jon Feb 8 '11 at 17:24
    
@siride: According to dictionary.reference.com/browse/wobbly: 3. slang throw a wobbly to become suddenly very agitated or angry. Maybe I'm strange, but I understood "throw a wobbly" right off. –  Jim Mischel Feb 8 '11 at 17:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That should work well, as it protects the file from concurrent access by multiple threads. The only thing I'd change is to combine the two sections in MyMethod. There's no reason to release the lock after creating the file, just so you can obtain the lock again in order to write. So rather than:

lock
{
  // Create file if necessary
}

lock
{
  // write to the file
}

Just do:

lock
{
  // create file if necessary
  // write to the file
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've got some code in between the two lock areas which I removed for the question but thanks for the answer. –  Jon Feb 8 '11 at 17:26
    
@Jon: Does the code inbetween use _tw or _tempFilename? If not, Jim's suggestion is much better. –  Jaroslav Jandek Feb 8 '11 at 17:34
    
Good point! Thanks –  Jon Feb 8 '11 at 17:35

The only issue I see is if the timer fires and there are 0 lines entered it could make a unnecessary file, but that could be the behavior you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, well spotted also if I didn't reset the linecount when the timer kicked in and its already at 500 when it writes a new line to a newly created file, that file would only have 1 line in it –  Jon Feb 8 '11 at 17:39

I'm no expert, but just a thought. What would happen if the timer fires straight after exiting the second lock in MyMethod.

private void MyMethod() {
  lock{}
  //Do processing
  lock{}
}

Would it try to move a file that has already been moved?

share|improve this answer

The code looks like it'll work, but if efficiency is an issue, I would've went the route of using buffers and using atomic swaps to change which file to output the buffer to.

Then writing to the buffer wouldn't have any locks involved, only the writing to the file would.

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No, it is not efficient because I think it can be done without locking.

public class NoLock
    {
        private Timer tmFileWriter;
        private StreamWriter _tw;
        private long _filelineCount = 0;

        private void StartUpMethod()
        {
            if (tmFileWriter == null)
            {
                tmFileWriter = new Timer(5000);
                tmFileWriter.AutoReset = false;
                tmFileWriter.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(tmFileWriter_Elapsed);
            }
            _tw = new StreamWriter(GetTempFilename());
        }

        private  string GetTempFilename()
        {
            return Path.GetTempFileName();
        }

        private void MyMethod()
        {
            // moved initial creation to setup method

            //Do some processing

            _tw.WriteLine(sql);
            _filelineCount++;
            if (_filelineCount > 500)
            {
                _filelineCount = 0;
                Roll();
            }
        }

        // handles rolling the file, the only shared state that is touched
        // is _tw and this is shielded from concurrency by an Interlocked.Exchange
        private void Roll()
        {
            tmFileWriter.Stop();
            StreamWriter rolledTo = new StreamWriter(GetTempFilename());
            StreamWriter oldWriter =  
               System.Threading.Interlocked.Exchange(ref _tw, rolledTo);
            oldWriter.Close();
            string _tempFilename = ((FileStream) oldWriter.BaseStream).Name;
            File.Move(_tempFilename, _tempFilename.Replace(".tmp", ".sql"));
            tmFileWriter.Start();
        }

        private  void tmFileWriter_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            Roll();
        }
    }
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