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I'm trying to get input from user and give output until s/he presses 'n'. It doesn't seem to work. Is problem in scanf or cin.get? When I press y it just takes "tekrar" as an input, thus gives "y" as output and goes into a loop. Also, doesn't stop when i give n as tekrar input.

char cevap[300]="";
char tekrar='y';
while (tekrar!='n')
{
  cin.get(cevap,300);
  cout<<cevap<<endl;
  cout<<"Again? (y/n)";
  scanf("%c",&tekrar);
}

output:

Hello
Again? (y/n)
y 
Again? (y/n)
y 
Again? (y/n)
n
Again? (y/n)
n 
...  
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2  
if you attach a debugger, you should be able to see the contents of cevap and tekrar. Or you could just add a cout statement, so you can easily see the values while the program runs. That will tell you if cevap or tekrar is not being updated properly. –  Tim Feb 8 '11 at 17:56
1  
mixing << and scanf can also cause issues –  Martin Beckett Feb 8 '11 at 17:57
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Mixing the various input methods on istream (get, getline, operator>>) can be fraught with peril if you're not aware of which methods leave the delimiter character in the stream and which don't, and handle them accordingly.

In this case, get will read 300 characters of input or input up until the newline, whichever happens first. The newline will not be extracted, and so will remain in the stream. That means your call to scanf() will read the newline and stop, leaving the y or n you just typed in the stream.

There are several ways to reorganize this code to make it do what it seems like you want. This is one way:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;
int main()
{
    string cevap;
    char tekrar='y';
    while (tekrar!='n')
    {
      getline(cin,cevap);
      cout<<cevap<<endl;
      cout<<"Again? (y/n)";
      tekrar = cin.get();
      cin.ignore();
    }

    return 0;
}

This uses std::string and the non-member getline to read input in such a way as to not require you to be limited to 300 characters (not strictly speaking related to the question, but good practice usually). getline consumes and discards the delimiter, but get, used to read the continuation input, doesn't, so we discard it manually via ignore.

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I suspect you're using cin.get() for demonstration purposes, because it seems to me that using std::getline(cin, tekrar) would work just as well in that case (assuming tekrar were changed to a std::string). –  Max Lybbert Feb 8 '11 at 18:17
    
Yup. I wanted to make as small a change to the original code as possible (I probably should have done it without getline, even, but I had to leave my desk) –  Josh Petrie Feb 8 '11 at 18:44
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Use cin operator>> to read from stdin, instead of scanf:

string cevap;
char tekrar='y';
while (tekrar!='n')
{
  getline(cin, cevap);
  cout<<cevap<<endl;
  cout<<"Again? (y/n)";
  cin >> tekrar;
  cin.get();
}

Edit: fixed the infinite loop. You should use std::string instead of a simple char array.

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This time, when i press 'y' it goes infinite loop. Doesn't wait for user to give the input (tekrar). –  Caner Öncü Feb 8 '11 at 18:07
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