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Here's my problem...I'm looking for (if it even exists) the enum equivalent of ArrayList.contains();.

Here's a sample of my code problem:

enum choices {a1, a2, b1, b2};

if(choices.???(a1)}{
//do this
} 

Now, I realize that an ArrayList of Strings would be the better route here but I have to run my enum contents through a switch/case elsewhere. Hence my problem.

Assuming something like this doesn't exist, how could I go about doing it?

Thanks!

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13 Answers

up vote 34 down vote accepted

This should do it:

public static boolean contains(String test) {

    for (Choice c : Choice.values()) {
        if (c.name().equals(test)) {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

This way means you do not have to worry about adding additional enum values later, they are all checked.

Edit: If the enum is very large you could stick the values in a HashSet:

public static HashSet<String> getEnums() {

  HashSet<String> values = new HashSet<String>();

  for (Choice c : Choice.values()) {
      values.add(c.name());
  }

  return values;
}

Then you can just do: values.contains("your string") which returns true or false.

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1  
that's a very poor impl.: Choice.valueOf(test) is what you want (w/ try/catch) –  bestsss Feb 8 '11 at 18:41
4  
bestsss, this is clearly the most appropriate solution. Throwing an exception to implement a type of exists() method is bad practice. While you may think that your implementation is more efficient due to it not looking O(n), it is in the underlying framework which is not visible. Also using try {} catch adds overhead. Plus, it's just not pretty. –  jluzwick Feb 8 '11 at 18:50
9  
@Jared, definitely valueOf. Just catch your exception and return false. To those who say otherwise, if you look at the implementation, it uses a Map already, and the JDK developers have a much better chance to optimize this. The API throws an exception, which is a debatable practice (instead of returning null), but when you deal with an API that throws an exception, go with it, don't reinvent the wheel. –  Yishai Feb 8 '11 at 18:59
1  
@jluzwick try/catch overhead is a simple jump instruction when not taken, not using the Exception in the catch block is also optimized. Fearing try/catch cause of loss of performance is a bad practice. –  bestsss Feb 8 '11 at 19:33
1  
@bestsss I'll give it to you that using try {} catch in your fashion is optimized and adds negligible overhead BUT using try {} catch in your example is commonly looked at as bad practice, see stackoverflow.com/questions/3515618/… . Since we can guarantee the same performance of the internal Java code without introducing any bugs, we should do the above. This is because it is MUCH clearer and cleaner than using try {} catch for program flow. –  jluzwick Feb 8 '11 at 19:48
show 8 more comments

You can use Enum.valueOf

enum Choices{A1, A2, B1, B2};

public class MainClass {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    Choices day;

    try {
       day = Choices.valueOf("A1");
       //yes
    } catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {  
        //nope
  }
}

If you expect the check to fail often, you might be better off using a simple loop as other have shown - if your enums contain many values, perhaps builda HashSet or similar of your enum values converted to a string and query that HashSet instead,

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I don't think there is, but you can do something like this:

enum choices {a1, a2, b1, b2};

public static boolean exists(choices choice) {
   for(choice aChoice : choices.values()) {
      if(aChoice == choice) {
         return true;
      }
   }
   return false;
}

Edit:

Please see Richard's version of this as it is more appropriate as this won't work unless you convert it to use Strings, which Richards does.

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but I think the OP wants to test a string? –  Richard H Feb 8 '11 at 18:38
    
yeah, haha. This method wouldn't be that effective as we already know choice is in the enums. Your modification is more correct. –  jluzwick Feb 8 '11 at 18:40
    
If you want to work on some subset of the enums themselves (and not their names), better to look at EnumSet. download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/EnumSet.html –  Yishai Feb 8 '11 at 18:44
    
Perhaps a stupid question, but why isn't the .values() documented at download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Enum.html ? –  Anonym Feb 8 '11 at 18:46
    
That's a great question. You're right it doesn't exist in the documentation and it doesn't exist in the Enum source either. I'm assuming it's present in one of the implementations of Enum or there is some JLS rule that allows for it. Also all Collection objects have this, and this can be looked at as a Collection even though it isn't necessarily implementing Collection. –  jluzwick Feb 8 '11 at 19:02
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Even better:

enum choices {
   a1, a2, b1, b2;

  public static boolean contains(String s)
  {
      for(choices choice:values())
           if (choice.name().equals(s)) 
              return true;
      return false;
  } 

};
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You can use valueOf("a1") if you want to look up by String

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but that is not elegant.. if the value does not exist it throws up an exception. so you must probably surround it with try catch –  Kasturi Feb 8 '11 at 18:35
    
That will throw an exception if the value doesn't exist –  Richard H Feb 8 '11 at 18:35
    
Less elegant than iterating through the enum choices looking for a matching object? –  jprete Feb 8 '11 at 18:36
    
The value will always exist –  Woot4Moo Feb 8 '11 at 18:36
    
Can the down voter please comment on why they down voted? –  Amir Afghani Feb 8 '11 at 18:41
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It is an enum, those are constant values so if its in a switch statement its just doing something like this:

case: val1
case: val2

Also why would you need to know what is declared as a constant?

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This bit of code isn't in said switch statement, that's elsewhere. I was simply stating that in this case, enum is necessary as others had suggested that I use an ArrayList instead. –  Jared Feb 8 '11 at 18:44
    
@Jared that makes far more sense now –  Woot4Moo Feb 8 '11 at 18:46
    
@Jared however that doesn't really matter as you already know the values that are there. Basically the enum equivalent of list.contains() is MyEnum.MyAwesomeValue –  Woot4Moo Feb 8 '11 at 18:47
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public boolean contains(Choices value) {
   return EnumSet.allOf(Choices.class).contains(value);
}
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that won't work. set have enum objects, while your're checking it for a string. –  iTake Nov 27 '13 at 9:46
    
thx, typo edited –  Anton Nov 28 '13 at 9:42
    
now the answer doesn't fit the question, as it was about String :) –  iTake Nov 28 '13 at 12:54
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With guava it's even simpler:

boolean isPartOfMyEnum(String myString){

return Lists.newArrayList(MyEnum.values().toString()).contains(myString);

}
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As kioria said this won't work. MyEnum.values() returns array of MyEnum instances and MyEnum.value().toString() returns string representation of this array object (just string like "[LMyEnum;@15b94ed3") –  user2137020 Feb 2 at 16:25
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This combines all of the approaches from previous methods and should have equivalent performance. It can be used for any enum, inlines the "Edit" solution from @Richard H, and uses Exceptions for invalid values like @bestsss. The only tradeoff is that the class needs to be specified, but that turns this into a two-liner.

import java.util.EnumSet;

public class HelloWorld {

static enum Choices {a1, a2, b1, b2}

public static <E extends Enum<E>> boolean contains(Class<E> _enumClass, String value) {
    try {
        return EnumSet.allOf(_enumClass).contains(Enum.valueOf(_enumClass, value));    
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return false; 
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (String value : new String[] {"a1", "a3", null}) {
        System.out.println(contains(Choices.class, value));
    }
}

}

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My reputation is less then required to comment, but I think that chaiyachaiya's and Pablo Santa Cruz answers are completely wrong. Firstly, Enum overwrites hashcode with == operator, as it's instances are guaranteed to be singletons and so it doesn't compare logical equality of operands. That's why if we use MyEnum.values() and check with contains(), we will always get false. Secondly, MyEnum.values().toString() will call toString() on the MyEnum class object, rather then on instances of the MyEnum class (if you override this method in the class of cause). So, what will you get with Lists.newArrayList(MyEnum.values().toString()).contains(myString)?

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Actually, MyEnum.values().toString() will call toString() on array of MyEnum objects. –  user2137020 Feb 2 at 16:36
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Use the Apache commons lang3 lib instead

 EnumUtils.isValidEnum(MyEnum.class, myValue)
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Why not combine Pablo's reply with a valueOf()?

public enum Choices
{
    a1, a2, b1, b2;

    public static boolean contains(String s) {
        try {
            Choices.valueOf(s);
            return true;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            return false;
        }
}
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enum are pretty powerful in Java. You could easily add a contains method to your enum (as you would add a method to a class):

enum choices {
  a1, a2, b1, b2;

  public boolean contains(String s)
  {
      if (s.equals("a1") || s.equals("a2") || s.equals("b1") || s.equals("b2")) 
         return true;
      return false;
  } 

};
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did you mean s.equals("b1") || s.equals("b2") ?? –  Jigar Joshi Feb 8 '11 at 18:32
    
Yes! Thanks a lot. –  Pablo Santa Cruz Feb 8 '11 at 18:34
2  
This probably won't be the best way to do it as you'll have to add new s.equals("xx") for each enum you add later on. –  jluzwick Feb 8 '11 at 18:34
    
And there's going to be a 1000+ enums. –  Jared Feb 8 '11 at 18:53
1  
How do people who suggest horrible solutions such as this, get 64K reputation? I hate to think of all the crappy code being slung out there based on this contributors answers –  George Jempty Nov 8 '13 at 18:05
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