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I understand, we use SSL to encrypt sensitive data like user name and password to transported to server without people in the network eavesdropping. So then server returns a secure token over HTTPS and its stored in cookie. We switch to HTTP after we have secure token, we attach cookie/secure token header to every HTTP request.

Now anybody can see my secure token and they can eavesdrop it and impersonate me. Is my understanding correct?

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Yes, if someone is able to recreate that cookie on their machine, they can be 'logged in' to the site. It's called Session Hijacking. –  drudge Feb 8 '11 at 18:43

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The cookies can be set per protocol, so that HTTPS cookies are not used for HTTP and vice versa. Also, the properly constructed secure token should include an IP address and have short expiration time.

But in general the best idea is of course to keep the authenticated session in secure channel - SSL is not that heavyweight these days (as computers became much faster than when SSL was first introduced) and also the heaviest part is handshake, which is performed only once if persistent HTTP connection is used (or when SSL session resuming is used).

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So If I just close the browser and didn't logout and somebody navigates to the site within the session expiration time, they can see my account details. Is my understanding correct? – iraSenthil 0 secs ago edit –  iraSenthil Feb 8 '11 at 18:55
    
//The cookies can be set per protocol, so that HTTPS cookies are not used for HTTP and vice versa.// How does it help if I want to use cookie for identifying client? Once I switch it to HTTP, then my identity is up in the air, anybody can grab it right? –  iraSenthil Feb 8 '11 at 18:56
    
@irasenthil 1. Even if you don't close the browser, the cookie can be stolen from computer memory and misused. But this would mean that your computer is compromised and you are in trouble anyway. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Feb 8 '11 at 19:03
    
@irasenthil "Once I switch it to HTTP, then my identity is up in the air" No, if you use HTTPS-specific cookies, they won't be sent when you switch to HTTP. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Feb 8 '11 at 19:04
    
@Eugene //if you use HTTPS-specific cookies, they won't be sent when you switch to HTTP// How server would idnetify me after I switch from HTTPS to HTTP? Would it send two different cookies one for HTTPS and another one for HTTP? –  iraSenthil Feb 8 '11 at 19:27

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