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In our repository we have initial version of database (binary file).

I have executed hg pull and I saw that someone committed another version of this file. As I won't to loose my changes in dev db, I did make a copy of it (copy file.db my_file.db) in same directory.

When I runned hg up, mercurial overwrited file.db with new version and deleted my_file.db!

I'm on windows 7 x64, and tried various software that recover deleted files, but with no success.

How can I get back my version of file.db or recover my_file.db? I didn't commit it.

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hmmm... hg rev -r PREVIOUS_REVISION file.db? Find out this revision by hg log. –  Elazar Leibovich Feb 8 '11 at 19:47
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@Elazar Zote wants to recover a file that wasn't committed.. its the my_file.db –  Lipis Feb 8 '11 at 19:48
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Did you use -C on the update? Do you have this defined as a default option or alias for up? Normally, the up will let you know you have uncommitted changes before allowing an update, so unless you added -C somehow, you shouldn't have lost your file. –  Mikezx6r Feb 8 '11 at 19:52
    
@Mikezx6r no I don't use -C. I hadn't defined as default. I have default windows installation. –  Zote Feb 8 '11 at 19:56
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@Zote: sorry, but I don't have any other ideas. –  Mikezx6r Feb 8 '11 at 20:26

1 Answer 1

I really don't think mercurial deleted your untracked file. Here's the sequence you've described as I understand it:

ry4an@four:~$ mkdir zote
ry4an@four:~$ cd zote
ry4an@four:~/zote$ hg init orig
ry4an@four:~/zote$ echo text > orig/file.db
ry4an@four:~/zote$ hg -R orig commit -A -m 'initial'
adding file.db
ry4an@four:~/zote$ hg clone orig clone
updating to branch default
1 files updated, 0 files merged, 0 files removed, 0 files unresolved
ry4an@four:~/zote$ mv clone/file.db clone/my_file.db
ry4an@four:~/zote$ echo more text >> orig/file.db
ry4an@four:~/zote$ hg -R orig commit -m 'new line'
ry4an@four:~/zote$ hg -R clone pull
pulling from /home/ry4an/zote/orig
searching for changes
adding changesets
adding manifests
adding file changes
added 1 changesets with 1 changes to 1 files
(run 'hg update' to get a working copy)
ry4an@four:~/zote$ hg -R clone update
remote changed file.db which local deleted
use (c)hanged version or leave (d)eleted? c
1 files updated, 0 files merged, 0 files removed, 0 files unresolved
ry4an@four:~/zote$ ls clone/
file.db  my_file.db
ry4an@four:~/zote$ cat clone/my_file.db 
text
ry4an@four:~/zote$ hg -R clone status
? my_file.db

You can see that afterward my_file.db is still there. Even with --clean as Mikezx6r mentiones the file is still there:

pulling from /home/ry4an/zote/orig
searching for changes
adding changesets
adding manifests
adding file changes
added 1 changesets with 1 changes to 1 files
(run 'hg update' to get a working copy)
ry4an@four:~/zote/clone$ hg update --clean
1 files updated, 0 files merged, 0 files removed, 0 files unresolved
ry4an@four:~/zote/clone$ ls -l
total 8
-rw-r--r-- 1 ry4an ry4an 15 2011-02-08 14:31 file.db
-rw-r--r-- 1 ry4an ry4an  5 2011-02-08 14:28 my_file.db
ry4an@four:~/zote/clone$ hg stat
? my_file.db
ry4an@four:~/zote/clone$ 

It's not what you want to hear, but it's much more likely you accidentally botched the 'mv' and only thought you created the copy or somehow externally deleted it. Or your antivirus app saw a pattern it didn't like a refused to create it, or some other horrible, accidental thing.

It's also not helpful now, but this is a great example of why you should commit early and often, and especially before updating -- it's just too easy to make mistakes, but once something in in the repo there's nothing you can do to accidentally remove it.

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I would also like to add that computers don't do things you don't tell them to, you just don't always know what you're telling it to do. –  msarchet Feb 8 '11 at 21:00
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@msarchet: this is the most stupid, pompous, comment I've ever read on SO I think. Have you ever heard of bug deleting or corrupting data? I'm not saying Mercurial (which I love btw) is at fault here. But writing that "computers don't do things you don't tell them to" is one of the most silly, stupid, pompous and mis-informed thing to write. I can't believe someone upvoted that comment. I suggest googling, say, the MS knowledge base for data corruption bugs... Just for a start. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Feb 8 '11 at 22:50
    
@SyntaxT3rr0r I'm pretty sure that a bug is something that is caused by a human not a computer. Sure computers can break down and have faults, but my comment is not as stupid and pompous as you would like it to be. –  msarchet Feb 9 '11 at 0:24
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@msarchet: be intellectually dishonest until the end: if a computer break down or has fault it's because an engineer made a mistake, of course! –  SyntaxT3rr0r Feb 9 '11 at 0:35
    
C:\CredinetX\DB>copy CredinetX.db CredinetX_meu.db 1 file(s) copied. C:\CredinetX\DB>hg up resolving manifests moving DB/CredinetX_meu.db to db/CredinetX_meu.db getting db/CredinetX.db 41 files updated, 0 files merged, 0 files removed, 0 files unresolved C:\CredinetX\DB>dir Volume in drive C is Windows7 Volume Serial Number is XXXX-XXXX Directory of C:\CredinetX\DB 08/02/2011 11:34 <DIR> . 08/02/2011 11:34 <DIR> .. 08/02/2011 11:34 8.175.616 CredinetX.db 1 File(s) 8.175.616 bytes 2 Dir(s) XXXXXX bytes free –  Zote Feb 9 '11 at 10:50

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