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I'm trying to create a linked list where you can update the data in a node, but no matter what I try, C doesn't seem to allow me to update the value of a void pointer (or rather where it points to). Here's the test code I have:

void newData(void * d)
{
    char data[] = "world";

    d = &data;
}

int main()
{
        char testData[] = "hello";
        void * testPointer = &testData;

        printf("TestData is %s\n", (char *)testPointer);

        // Modify the data
        newData(&testPointer);

        printf("TestData is %s\n", (char *)testPointer);
}

Which just outputs::

TestData is hello
TestData is hello

Am I missing something obvious here? I've also tried using a pointer to a pointer, but to no avail.

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2  
The argument type is wrong, it should be void**. –  Hans Passant Feb 8 '11 at 20:29
    
Or just call it as `newData(testPointer);'? –  John Feb 8 '11 at 20:32
    
` void * testPointer = &testData;` Address operator isn't required in this statement. When you assign an array to a pointer, array's address get's assigned. So, instead you can do void * testPointer = testData;. There are other statements too in your program where you can do this. –  Mahesh Feb 8 '11 at 20:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Two things are wrong with this:

char data[] = "world";

Is probably created as part of the function's stack frame. Arrays degrade to pointers. As such, when function calls ret, it should have cleaned up its stack and the memory at that address is gone. If any operation works here, it is because you haven't overwritten the memory yet.

What could you do? Declare it static is one solution that guarantees (according to c99 at least) program-lifetime existence (i.e. it won't be allocated on the stack but in the data segment, and the c library allocates it for you before main). However, since I suspect this is just a demo, it is worth pointing out that:

char data[] = "world";
memcpy(d, data, 5);

Is perfectly valid, since you're copying contents and not pointing to values.

newData(&testPointer);

You're making a simple mistake here. A pointer, in assembly is a memory address holding another memory address. When you pass a pointer to a function, you want to pass that memory address, so that when you call that function the contents of the pointer, a memory address, are copied onto the stack in the form of a new pointer. Of course, both these pointers point to the same thing, which is how you end up achieving a pass-by-reference type thing. If you don't believe me, watch it in a debugger.

However, what you're doing is passing the address of a pointer, so you are creating a pointer to a pointer to a value. Imagine the memory like this:

|Address|Value
|0x120  |0x121    <-- this is what you're passing with &testPointer
|0x121  |0x122    <-- this is a pointer; it contains the address of a value
|0x122  |h        <-- this is a value.
|0x123  |e
|0x124  |l
...

I hope that makes it clearer. In my simplistic memory, you're passing 0x120 rather than 0x121. You can of course dereference twice, but why? The simple solution is just to pass the pointer like this:

newData(testPointer);
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As explained in a comment to another answer, the local variable 'data' is on the stack, but "world\0" exists in the data segment of the program, so data[] = "world" is valid. –  user47559 Feb 8 '11 at 22:18
    
Another way to think of it is: 'data' is a local variable on the stack, but it points to a location that's not on the stack. –  user47559 Feb 8 '11 at 22:25

I think you need

void newData(void ** d) 
{
    char data[] = "world";
    *d = &data;  
}     

However, this has it's own problems, as "world" is stack local, and won't be valid after you return from newData.

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2  
Though, I do think it would work if he changed it to const char* data = "world"; as "world" would then be a hard-coded string in the binary. –  TheBuzzSaw Feb 8 '11 at 20:31
    
Does that mean I need to allocate some more space for a new value, or is there any easier way? I just simply want to change the string inside testPointer. –  Lewis Feb 8 '11 at 20:35
2  
@Lewis: there is no string "inside" test pointer. C-style strings don't work like that. The C-style string is essentially a pointer to the first character of some character sequence. So this character sequence must somehow exist. When you assign a literal to a char pointer (char* data = "world"), the char sequence containing "world\0" is created by the compiler implicitly, and stored in the program data. So the assignment just assigns the address of the previously allocated data to the variable. –  Vlad Feb 8 '11 at 20:38
    
Ok thanks for the help :). So just to confirm, do I definitely need a pointer to a pointer? I have been given a header file which has the interface with just a single pointer, but I suspect it may be wrong. –  Lewis Feb 8 '11 at 21:18

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