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I would like to dynamically add properties to a ExpandoObject at runtime. So for example to add a string property call NewProp I would like to write something like

var x = new ExpandoObject();
x.AddProperty("NewProp", System.String);

Is this easily possible?

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up vote 250 down vote accepted
dynamic x = new ExpandoObject();
x.NewProp = string.Empty;

Alternatively:

var x = new ExpandoObject() as IDictionary<string, Object>;
x.Add("NewProp", string.Empty);
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13  
I've never realized that Expando implements IDictionary<string, object>. I've always thought that cast would copy it to a dictionary. However, your post made me understand that if you change the Dictionary, you also change the underlying ExpandoObject! Thanks a lot – Dyna Jan 27 '12 at 18:48
1  
getting Error 53 Cannot convert type 'System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject' to 'System.Collections.Generic.IDictionary<string,string>' via a reference conversion, boxing conversion, unboxing conversion, wrapping conversion, or null type conversion – TheVillageIdiot Oct 30 '12 at 9:23
12  
It's IDictionary<string, object>, not IDictionary<string, string>. – Stephen Cleary Oct 30 '12 at 13:29
1  
@tic: It's not the same; consider: string value = ((dynamic)x).NewProp; – Stephen Cleary Oct 1 '15 at 16:29
1  
@user123456: Property names are always strings; they can't be dynamic. If by "is a dynamic", you mean "isn't known until runtime", then you have to use the second example. If by "is a dynamic", you mean the property value is dynamic, then that's fine. Having a dynamic value works fine for either example. – Stephen Cleary Feb 17 at 15:29

As explained here by Filip - http://www.filipekberg.se/2011/10/02/adding-properties-and-methods-to-an-expandoobject-dynamicly/

You can add method too at runtime.

x.Add("Shout", new Action(() => { Console.WriteLine("Hellooo!!!"); }));
x.Shout();
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