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I guess not, but I would like to confirm. Is there any use for const Foo&&, where Foo is a class type?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 32 down vote accepted

They are occasionally useful. The draft C++0x itself uses them in a few places, for example:

template <class T> void ref(const T&&) = delete;
template <class T> void cref(const T&&) = delete;

The above two overloads ensure that the other ref(T&) and cref(const T&) functions do not bind to rvalues (which would otherwise be possible).

Update

I've just checked the official standard N3290, which unfortunately isn't publicly available, and it has in 20.8 Function objects [function.objects]/p2:

template <class T> void ref(const T&&) = delete;
template <class T> void cref(const T&&) = delete;

Then I checked the most recent post-C++11 draft, which is publicly available, N3485, and in 20.8 Function objects [function.objects]/p2 it still says:

template <class T> void ref(const T&&) = delete;
template <class T> void cref(const T&&) = delete;
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Looking at cppreference it appears this isn't the case anymore. Any ideas why? Any other places const T&& is used? –  Pubby Dec 13 '12 at 0:17
    
Actually, cppreference might just not display deleted functions. Haven't checked the standard. –  Pubby Dec 13 '12 at 0:25
    
@Pubby cppreference certainly displays deleted functions, those were omitted by mistake. –  Cubbi Feb 17 '13 at 17:12
4  
Why did you include the same code in your answer three times? I tried to find a difference for too long. –  typ1232 Jul 15 '13 at 0:16
2  
@typ1232: It appears that I updated the answer nearly 2 years after I answered it, due to concerns in the comments that the referenced functions no longer appeared. I did a copy/paste from N3290, and from the then-lastest draft N3485 to show that the functions still appeared. Using copy/paste, in my mind at the time, was the best way to ensure that more eyes than mine could confirm that I wasn't overlooking some minor change in these signatures. –  Howard Hinnant Jul 15 '13 at 3:31

They are allowed and even functions ranked based on const, but since you can't move from const object referred by const Foo&&, they aren't useful.

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What exactly do you mean by the "ranked" remark? Something to do with overload resolution, I guess? –  FredOverflow Feb 8 '11 at 22:05
    
Why couldn't you move from a const rvalue-ref, if the given type has a move ctor that takes a const rvalue-ref? –  Fred Nurk Feb 8 '11 at 22:09
1  
@FredOverflow, the ranking of overload is this: const T&, T&, const T&&, T&& –  Gene Bushuyev Feb 8 '11 at 22:10
1  
@Fred: How do you move without modifying the source? –  FredOverflow Feb 8 '11 at 22:49
1  
@Fred: Mutable data members, or perhaps moving for this hypothetical type doesn't require modifying data members. –  Fred Nurk Feb 8 '11 at 22:52

I can't think of a situation where this would be useful directly, but it might be used indirectly:

template<class T>
void f(T const &x) {
  cout << "lvalue";
}
template<class T>
void f(T &&x) {
  cout << "rvalue";
}

template<class T>
void g(T &x) {
  f(T());
}

template<class T>
void h(T const &x) {
  g(x);
}

The T in g is T const, so f's x is an T const&&.

It is likely this results in a comile error in f (when it tries to move or use the object), but f could take an rvalue-ref so that it cannot be called on lvalues, without modifying the rvalue (as in the too simple example above).

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