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I understand that cin.eof() tests the stream format. And while giving input, end of character is not reached when there is wrong in the input. I tested this on my MSV C++ 2010 and am not understanding the strange results. No matter what I give the input, I am getting Format Error message that is present in the program.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int i;
    cin>> i;

    if(!cin.eof())
    {
        cout<< "\n Format Error \n";
    }
    else
    {
        cout<< "\n Correct Input \n";
    }

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

Results I expected:

Values for i =

  1. 10 => Correct Input but the output is Format Error
  2. 12a => Format Error

Could someone explain where I am going wrong. Thanks.

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1  
See also Semantics of flags on basic_ios. –  James McNellis Feb 8 '11 at 23:13
    
@James: I was just thinking "This needs to be made an FAQ!" when I saw it already is. Good! –  sbi Feb 9 '11 at 7:34

8 Answers 8

std::cin.eof() tests for end-of-file (hence eof), not for errors. For error checking use !std::cin.good(), the built-in conversion operator (if(std::cin)) or the boolean negation operator (if(!std::cin)).

share|improve this answer
    
For the input 12a to an int, I am getting the message Correct Input when used !std::cin.good() –  Mahesh Feb 8 '11 at 22:36
1  
@Mahesch: Yep, that's because this reads the "12" from the input and leaves the "a" in the input buffer for further input operations to read. –  sbi Feb 8 '11 at 22:38
1  
@BillyONeal: Good will be false whenever eofbit is set even if the extraction was successfully completed. Testing good() is not the same as testing !fail(). –  Fred Nurk Feb 8 '11 at 23:01
1  
@BillyONeal: That is wrong. Extraction can complete successfully and set eofbit. –  Fred Nurk Feb 8 '11 at 23:05
1  
@KarlKnechtel: That is why my first comment here says not to use good() or eof(), but does say to test the stream itself after attempting extraction (since that is the context here). That is exactly what I do in my answer and also what wilx's later answer does; did you miss that first comment? –  Fred Nurk Feb 9 '11 at 1:11

Use a direct test of the status of the stream with:

while (cin >> i)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Your question was marked as 'low quality' because of its extreme brevity. Although accurate, it is a good idea to provide some explanation of why your answer is correct, especially when the question was asked a long time ago (about a year ago) and there are multiple answers. Also note the {} icon above the editor box; that can be used to indent code snippets. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 27 '12 at 4:49
#include <iostream>

int main() {
  using namespace std;
  int i;
  if (cin >> i) {
    cout << "Extracted an int, but it is unknown if more input exists.\n";
    char c;
    if (cin.get(c)) {  // Or: cin >> c, depending on how you want to handle whitespace.
      cin.putback(c);
      cout << "More input exists.\n";
      if (c == '\n') {  // Doesn't work if you use cin >> c above.
        cout << "But this was at the end of this line.\n";
      }
    }
    else {
      cout << "No more input exists.\n";
    }
  }
  else {
    cout << "Format error.\n";
  }
  return 0;
}

Also see Testing stream.good() or !stream.eof() reads last line twice.

Sample session with the above program, note that input lines are marked with comments not present in the actual output:

$ your-program
12  # input
Extracted an int, but it is unknown if more input exists.
More input exists.
But this was at the end of this line.

$ your-program
12a  # input
Extracted an int, but it is unknown if more input exists.
More input exists.

$ echo -n 12 | your-program
Extracted an int, but it is unknown if more input exists.
No more input exists.

$ your-program
a  # input
Format error.
share|improve this answer
    
Agree with downvoter: you should test your code first. There's always at least a trailing newline to consume. –  UncleBens Feb 8 '11 at 23:00
    
@UncleBens: If you want to skip whitespace, use cin >> c, as I said. But there is not always a trailing newline: echo -n 12 | your-program –  Fred Nurk Feb 8 '11 at 23:01
    
@UncleBens: While the answer is lacking an explanation of what is going on, I cannot really agree with that statement. Compile this in a linux/osx box and run $ echo -n 10 | ./test_app. You can probably achieve the same in a windows terminal (or by piping a file through the program). There is not always a trailing new line to consume. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 8 '11 at 23:05
    
It is not uncommon to use stringstreams or iostreams attached to other devices (such as the network), but echo -n is the clearest way to show this. –  Fred Nurk Feb 8 '11 at 23:10
1  
@UncleBens: Didn't you make the point that the OP hasn't provided enough information to decide what is and isn't correct? How do we know what's useless and what isn't without knowing the former? –  Fred Nurk Feb 9 '11 at 0:32

Adding to the previous answer: After reading your input (like 10), you are not at end-of-file, as you can easily type some more. How is the system to know that you will not?

When reading your second input (12a), it correctly reads all the digits that can be part of an integer. The letter 'a' cannot, so it is left for some possible later input. For example, you can read all parts of 12a with this code

int i; char c;

cin >> i >> c;

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Assuming your input is line based, I suggest that you read the whole line using std::getline(). Once you have the line, you can analyse it and decide whether it contains correct or wrong input. Put the line into std::istringstream and do something like the following:

Edit: Changed !! iss to static_cast<bool>(iss) for compatibility with C++0x.

std::istringstream iss (line);
char ch;
long lval;
// read the input
iss >> lval;
// result variable will contain true if the input was correct and false otherwise
result
    // check that we have read a number of at least one digit length
    = static_cast<bool>(iss)
    // check that we cannot read anything beyond the value read above
    && ! (iss >> ch);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for an appropriate, robust way to do what the OP actually apparently wants to do. –  Karl Knechtel Feb 9 '11 at 0:50
    
I'm sorry, but I cannot upvote anything that uses !!. That's what != 0 is for. –  Billy ONeal Feb 9 '11 at 0:56
1  
@BillyONeal: Comparing a stream to 0 does not make any sense. I also dislike !!, but != 0 would be worse. @wilx: bool(iss). –  Fred Nurk Feb 9 '11 at 1:02
    
@Fred: The problem with casting to bool is that it will throw warnings on several compilers. If you don't like != 0 then use fail() explicitly. Don't use !!. –  Billy ONeal Feb 9 '11 at 1:04
1  
@wilx: I don't know if it's a problem either, but I do know the comments and the code disagree. –  Fred Nurk Feb 9 '11 at 8:07

For an input stream to enter the EOF state you have to actually make an attempt to read past the end of stream. I.e. it is not enough to reach the end-of-stream location in the stream, it is necessary to actually try to read a character past the end. This attempt will result in EOF state being activated, which in turn will make cin.eof() return true.

However, in your case you are not only not doing that, you (most likely) are not even reaching the end of stream. If you input your 10 from the keyboard, you probably finished the input by pressing the [Enter] key. This resulted in a new-line character being added to the input stream. So, what you are actually parsing with >> operator in this case is actually a 10\n sequence. Since you requested an int value from the stream, it only reads the numerical characters from the stream, i.e. it reads 1 and 0, but it stops at \n. That \n remains in the stream. You never read it. So, obviously, your code never reaches the end-of-file position in the stream. You have to reason to expect cin.eof() to become true in such case.

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cin.eof() test if the stream has reached end of file which happens if you type something like Ctrl+C (on Windows), or if input has been redirected to a file etc.

To test if the input contains an integer and nothing but an integer, you can get input first into a string and then convert that with a stringstream. A stringstream indeed reaches eof if there's no more to be extracted from it.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

int main() {
    using namespace std;
    int i;
    string input;
    cin >> input; //or getline(cin, input)
    stringstream ss(input);
    if (ss >> i && ss.eof()) {  //if conversion succeeds and there's no more to get
        cout<< "\n Correct Input \n";
    }
    else {
        cout<< "\n Format Error \n";
    }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

EOF stands for e nd o f f ile. std::cin is the standard input. The standard input, under normal circumstances, never reaches the end: you can always just type some more.

Further, .eof() only returns true if an input operation has already failed because of trying to read past the end of the file. The program actually can't tell that it's "at the end of file"; that is, the only way it can find out that the next attempt to read data will fail is by actually making the attempt.

share|improve this answer
    
Close, but wrong: eof() is tied to reading past the end of the file, but not to whether an input operation has already failed. (I already explained this to Billy in comments, so I'll point there rather than go over it again here.) Thus, if !fail() but eof(), you know you are at EOF without reading again. (Even so, !fail() and !eof() doesn't tell you whether the next read will fail due to EOF, which is in line with your answer.) –  Fred Nurk Feb 9 '11 at 0:55
    
@Fred Please explain how a file reading operation can read past the end of the file, but succeed. –  Karl Knechtel Feb 9 '11 at 0:56
1  
I link to an example on codepad.org that does exactly that in the comments linked to in my above comment. Since you specifically say "file reading operation", here's another example: getline on the last line of a file where the line is missing its terminating newline. –  Fred Nurk Feb 9 '11 at 0:57

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